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One Day University with The Raleigh News and Observer

October 05, 2019 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
Three Paintings Every Art Lover Should See

Tina Rivers Ryan / Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo), Formerly Columbia University

Could you name the three most important paintings in Western art? That is, the ones that most influenced the course of art, or history, or both? (Perhaps you're thinking about Michelangelo's Sistine Ceiling, or Leonardo's Last Supper?) While a fun exercise, there is no definitive list of the "most important" paintings—or the most beautiful, or the most famous, or the most valuable. And even if we could identify the "most important" paintings, it would not necessarily answer the more profound questions we might ask: namely, why has painting played so central a role in Western culture for centuries, and why does it continue to be the most popular medium for artists working today?

Covering six centuries of painting in about sixty minutes, this lecture looks at three undisputable masterpieces that exemplify how paintings communicate ideas and shape how we see the world. In short, these are paintings that every art lover should see if they want to understand art—and that everyone who doesn't love art should see if they want to fall in love with it. The paintings include:

  • - Jan van Eyck’s Arnolfini Portrait, 1434 (National Gallery, London)
  • - Raphael’s School of Athens, 1509-10 (Vatican, Rome)
  • - Rembrandt's Self-Portrait, 1658 (Frick Collection, NYC)

Tina Rivers Ryan / Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo), Formerly Columbia University
An art historian by training, Dr. Tina Rivers Ryan is currently a curator at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York. She holds five degrees in art history, including a BA from Harvard and a PhD from Columbia, and has taught classes on art at museums including The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, as well as at the University at Buffalo, the Pratt Institute, and Columbia, where she was one of the top-ranked instructors of the introduction to art history. A regular critic for Artforum, the world's leading art publication, her writing also has appeared in scholarly journals and books, and in catalogs published by museums across America and Europe.

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
The Shifting Lens of History: How We Reimagine the Past

Stephanie Yuhl / College of the Holy Cross

From the kiss in Times Square to "Rosie the Riveter" to "Saving Private Ryan," Americans tend to cherish their memories of WWII as "the best war ever." Yet the Vietnam War remains controversial and brings up an entirely different set of images – from anti-war protests to Agent Orange to the film, "Born on the Fourth of July." What helps explain these radically different understandings of two wars only twenty years apart? Of course, things get even more interesting when we take into consideration the historical memories of the other nations involved in these conflicts.

In this course, we will examine how different societies remember these wars and what those memories might tell us about national hopes and values, about generational change, and even about decisions regarding the military. Animating this presentation is the notion that history is different from the past – it is the often contested way that the past is remembered in the present.

Stephanie Yuhl / College of the Holy Cross
Stephanie Yuhl is a Professor of History at the College of the Holy Cross. She is a recipient of the Fletcher M. Green and Charles W. Ramsdell Award for the best article published in the Journal of Southern History, as well as the Inaugural Burns Career Teaching Medal for Outstanding Teaching. Professor Yuhl is also an Associate at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in the Critical Conservation Program, and an expert in twentieth-century US cultural and social history, with specialities in historical memory, social movements, gender, and Southern history. She is the author of the award-winning book, "A Golden Haze of Memory: The Making of Historic Charleston."

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
Turning Points in American Politics

Jason Nichols / University of Maryland

This class will describe the four major turning points in American political history that have shaped and defined who we are as a nation: the American Revolution, the Civil War, the Great Depression, and the Obama-Trump Era. Each turning point has been instrumental in refining the American experiment. We’ve created political norms, only to later defy them and create new ones.

These turning points have impacted our worldview on human rights, our financial direction, and our approach to foreign and domestic relations. During this class, we will discuss the building of our constitution and how over time we’ve found ways to either bolster or undermine it.

Jason Nichols / University of Maryland
Jason Nichols is a professor at the University of Maryland College Park. His work has been featured in Al-Jazeera, The Guardian, Latino Rebels, The Hill, NBC News and many other prominent publications, and he makes regular appearances on local television and cable news programs. He has received the Academic Excellence Award for Outstanding Faculty from the Office of Multicultural Student Education and the M. Lucia James Impact Award from the Student Success Leadership Council. He was also awarded the Faculty Advisor of the Year Award by the UMCP NAACP.

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