New Classes. New Cities. Discounts and More!

One Day University with the Sun Sentinel (Boca Raton)

January 26, 2020 9:30 AM – 1:00 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
The Civil War in 15 Objects

Harold Holzer / Hunter College

This illustrated talk invites us to reimagine the bloody, transformative American Civil War—and the men and women who fought it—through surviving objects that they wore, wrote, carried, painted, sculpted, or collected during this transformative upheaval. From the iconic (one of the pikes John Brown’s abolitionist crusaders carried to Harpers Ferry, or the handwritten terms for Lee’s surrender to Grant at Appomattox) to the startlingly rare (Lincoln’s secretly written estimate of his chances at re-election, or an impeccably preserved Union soldier’s uniform in the incongruous style of a Foreign Legion fighter), these relics vividly reflect the human side of the conflict, and its enormous impact on life, property, and the national social order.

All the treasures come from the collection of the New-York Historical Society, and were featured in Harold Holzer’s widely praised 2013 book, The Civil War in 50 Objects.

Harold Holzer / Hunter College
Harold Holzer, winner of The 2015 Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize, is one of the country's leading authorities on Abraham Lincoln and the political culture of the Civil War era. A prolific writer and lecturer, and frequent guest on television, Holzer was co-chairman of the U. S. Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, appointed by President Clinton. President Bush awarded Holzer the National Humanities Medal in 2008. And in 2013, Holzer wrote a Lincoln essay for the official program at the re-inauguration of President Obama. He also served as historical consultant for the Steven Spielberg film "Lincoln".

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM
What We Know About The Brain (And What We Don't)

Jessica Payne / University of Notre Dame

You are your brain, according to modern neuroscience, but how exactly do your thoughts, feelings, perceptions and sense of self derive from this three-pound organ locked inside the black box of your skull? Scientists have been seeking answers to those questions for decades, and finding surprising answers in the brains of people with psychiatric and neurological disorders.

Join us on a journey deep into the brain, the mind, and the self, as Professor Jessica Payne reveals the startling and exciting recent findings of cutting-edge neuroscience. How does your brain accomplish spontaneous creativity? How much self-control or "free will" do we really have? And what does the future hold, once brains begin to integrate with "neural prosthetics"? Get to know your dynamic unconscious mind, a bigger part of "who you are" than you could ever guess.

Jessica Payne / University of Notre Dame
Jessica Payne is the Nancy O'Neill Collegiate Chair and Professor of Psychology at the University of Notre Dame, where she directs the Sleep, Stress, and Memory Lab. Her course, The Sleeping Brain, routinely sports a waitlist because of its immense popularity among Notre Dame students. In 2012, Professor Payne received the Frank O'Malley Undergraduate Teaching Award. She is also a two-time recipient of the Distinction in Teaching Award, and won the Award for Teaching Excellence at Harvard University's Derek Bok Center.

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
How to Listen to (And Appreciate) Great Music

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University

We all love some form of music, but we will love it even more when we learn how to listen more closely. The way a piece or a song moves us is ultimately what makes music lovers come back for more. However, the ease with which we can hear any type of music today and the endless outlets for different kinds of music creates the problem of over-saturation. We have become passive listeners, tuning most sounds out and are often unable to participate in a more active style of listening. At the heart of appreciating great music is the concept of active listening—becoming more attuned to the communication from the composer and performer to the listener.

This class will explain and demonstrate the concept of active listening and provide techniques to get more pleasure from great music reflecting a wide variety of styles. We will focus on melody and the different ways melodies can create meaning in music; we will listen to excerpts of music from the classical, jazz, and popular traditions in order to "stretch our ears" and get more pleasure from the musical experience.

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University
Orin Grossman is renowned internationally for his knowledge of music. He lectures and performs concerts throughout the US and Europe, he teaches Performing Arts at Fairfield University, and has served as the University's Academic Vice President. Professor Grossman has been particularly associated with the music of George Gershwin, performing concerts of his song transcriptions and classical pieces to critical praise around the world, including performances in Cairo and New York. Professor Grossman was also chosen to play for the New York City Mayor's Awards of Honor for Arts and Culture.

register now

$159.00

for the event

To register for this event, please

If you already have an account, please