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One Day University: 6 Professors with The Seattle Times

March 04, 2017 9:15 AM – 1:25 PM

Join us as we present One Day University in Seattle. Spend a fascinating day with six award-winning professors as you experience three thought-provoking talks and countless engaging ideas - all in one day. And don't worry, there are no tests, no grades and no homework. Just the pure joy of lifelong learning!

schedule

9:15 AM - 10:25 AM
Is that Really Art? Understanding and Appreciating Modern Painting

Tina Rivers Ryan / Columbia University and Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo)

Here's a question that all art lovers today have had to ask themselves: How do you look at a painting of a woman made of geometric shapes and shadows? What about a canvas painted a single, solid color? Or covered in paint drips? Or printed with a photographic image? Do any of these really count as "art," let alone as "paintings?" And how do you know which ones are "good?" 

The key to answering these questions is to understand that modern art is a conversation, a dialogue between artists about the very nature of art that has been going on for generations. In this talk, we will look closely at four paintings, culled from the movements of Cubism, Constructivism, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop, in order to understand how artists in different times and places have explored these fundamental issues in their work. After learning to look at these modern works, we will consider whether this conversation is still unfolding: are we still making "modern" art, or did modernism end, giving way to something altogether different?

Tina Rivers Ryan / Columbia University and Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo)
An art historian by training, Dr. Tina Rivers Ryan is currently Assistant Curator of contemporary art at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York. She holds a BA from Harvard, three Master's Degrees, and a PhD from Columbia, and has taught classes on art at institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, the Pratt Institute, and Columbia, where she was one of the top-ranked instructors of the introduction to art history, "Art Humanities: Masterpieces of Western Art." A regular critic for Artforum, her writing has also appeared in periodicals such as Art in America and Art Journal, and in catalogs published by museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center, and the Tate. As a public speaker and scholar, Dr. Ryan has delivered lectures on topics ranging from Michelangelo to Warhol in more than 50 cities internationally.

9:15 AM - 10:25 AM
The Paradox of Choice: When More is Less

Barry Schwartz / Swarthmore College

It seems only logical that the more choice people have, the better off they are. People who don't care can ignore most options. And people who do care will be able to find just what they want. But however true this is logically, /psycho/logically it is false. Too much choice can paralyze people, lead them to make bad decisions and make them dissatisfied with even good decisions. This is especially true for people who are out to get the "best." Our task is to find ways to limit options so that people derive the benefits of choice without suffering the psychological costs.

Barry Schwartz / Swarthmore College
Barry Schwartz is the Dorwin Cartwright professor of social theory and social action at Swarthmore College. He has written several books on human behavior topics such as learning, memory, and choice making.

10:45 AM - 11:55 AM
Managing Stress: The Power of Mindset

Nicole Weekes / Pomona College

In this course, we will discuss the science of both stress and stress management. Professor Nicole Weekes will explain the basics of the stress response, and distinguish between the different types of stressors – the events that cause dis-ease – and the perception of dis-ease. We will also talk about the role of the brain in stress, stress management techniques, and coping strategies. We will conclude with mindfulness training and even try a couple of helpful mindfulness exercises.

You will leave this course with a better understanding of how stress is represented in the mind and in the brain, how stress affects both psychological and physical health, and the best practices for managing stress for a healthier life.

Nicole Weekes / Pomona College
Nicole Weekes is a psychology professor at Pomona College. Her research focuses on the psychological and biological stress response. She has received Pomona College's Wig Distinguished Professor Award for Excellence in Teaching three times, as well as the Carnegie Foundation's California Professor of the Year, and the Emerging Black Scholars Award from the Black Issues in Higher Education Journal.

10:45 AM - 11:55 AM
Does America's Political System Still Work?

Sean Theriault / University of Texas

The book explaining the American political system needs to be rewritten. Everything changed in 2016. Donald Trump’s campaign and victory broke the mold on how we thought politics worked. Meanwhile, Congress's popularity is lower than head lice, root canals, and traffic jams. In light of these political earthquakes, does America's political system still work?

This lecture will put the the Trump presidency into a more historical perspective in order to critically evaluate the ability of the presidency and Congress to function — or not. The system designed by the American framers may have finally met its match. Professor Theriault will argue that the same thing that saved America in the wake of the Civil War, the Great Depression, and the 1960s, will save it again: the vigilance of the American people. But only if they choose to exercise their democratic responsibilities.

Sean Theriault / University of Texas
Sean Theriault is a professor of politics at the University of Texas. He has received numerous teaching awards, including the Friar Society Teaching Fellowship, UT Professor of the Year, and the Regent's Outstanding Teaching Award. In 2012, he was inducted into the Academy of Distinguished Teachers. Professor Theriault's research is on the distinction between ideological and war-making behavior in the U.S. Congress.

12:15 PM - 1:25 PM
Five Turning Points That Changed American History

Edward O'Donnell / Holy Cross College

In the relatively short history of the United States, there have been many turning points and landmark movements that irrevocably altered the direction of the nation and signaled the dramatic start of a new historical reality. Some took the form of groundbreaking political and philosophical concepts; some were dramatic military victories and defeats. Still others were nationwide social and religious movements, or technological and scientific innovations.

What all of these turning points had in common, is that they forever changed the character of America. Sometimes the changes brought about by these events were obvious; sometimes they were more subtle. Sometimes the effects of these turning points were immediate; other times, their aftershocks reverberated for decades. Regardless, these great historical turning points demand to be understood.

Edward O'Donnell / Holy Cross College
Edward O'Donnell is a professor of History at Holy Cross College. He is the author of several books, including "Henry George and the Crisis of Inequality: Progress and Poverty in the Gilded Age." He frequently contributes op-eds to publications like Newsweek and the Huffington Post. He has been featured on PBS, the History Channel, the Discovery Channel, and C-SPAN. O'Donnell also has curated several major museum exhibits on American history and appeared in several historical documentaries. He currently hosts a history podcast, In The Past Lane.

12:15 PM - 1:25 PM
Race in America: Past, Present, and Future

Alexes Harris / University of Washington

Race and ethnicity are social constructs that have led to real structural forces on individuals and societies. This lecture will provide students with an overview of various social science perspectives on race and ethnicity. We will explore a range of definitions and understandings associated with race and ethnicity, as well as the construction of identities. We will also examine how, in the United States, these concepts are used, manipulated, and applied to influence the different chances of individuals and groups.

The goal of this course is to help students develop a more thorough understanding of the various dynamics of race and ethnicity in American society. We will develop insight into the definition, meaning, power, and limits of race and ethnicity in American society. In this class, the ultimate goal is to provide students with a space to think critically about race and ethnicity in a broader context than we usually do in the United States, and to understand how sociologists approach the topic. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate the concept of race and ethnicity and increase their ability in recognizing points where race intersects with other important identities (e.g., gender, sexuality, class, age).

Alexes Harris / University of Washington
Alexes Harris is a professor of sociology at the University of Washington. Her research has been published in a number of academic journals, including The American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Law and Society Review and Symbolic Interaction. Professor Harris' research for her book "A Pound of Flesh," has received widespread media attention from outlets like The New York Times, The Nation, The New Yorker The Los Angeles Times, NPR, and The Seattle Times. She is the recipient of numerous honors, grants, and teaching awards, and has been listed among the "40 Under 40 To Watch" at UW.

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Please call 1-800-300-3438 to be added to the waiting list.