New Classes. New Cities. Discounts and More!

One Day University with The Fresno Bee

March 11, 2017 9:30 AM – 4:15 PM

One Day University is excited to be back in Fresno with The Fresno Bee for a fascinating event on March 11th. The professors speaking that day have won dozens of teaching awards and earned the highest possible ratings from their students on campus. One Day University is your opportunity to join them for a truly unique and exhilarating day. Of course, at One Day U there are no grades, no tests, no homework — just the pure joy of lifelong learning!
 
Students will have a 1 hour and 15 minute lunch break. You my bring your own or purchase it at a nearby restaurant.

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Why Some People Are Resilient, and Others Are Not

Andrew Shatte / University of Arizona

In this fast-paced, interactive, and fun session Dr. Andrew Shatté will lead you on a tour of the big questions in the psychology of resilience. Why does one person overcome adversity while another falls into helplessness? What are the 7 ingredients that make up resilience - and do you have them?

We will see that habits in how we think have an enormous impact on resilience. You will gain insight into two of your thinking styles and learn about the impact they can have on your success, happiness, and health. Dr. Shatté will show you how to boost resilience with case studies from his work in large corporations and the public sector. And in the final moments of the workshop, he'll even reveal the biggest secret to a life of resilience!

Andrew Shatte / University of Arizona
Andrew Shatté teaches psychology at the University of Arizona, and is also the founder and President of Mindflex, a training company that specializes in measuring and training for resilience. Professor Shatté first joined One Day University when he was a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was given the "Best Professor" award by the students in 2003 and received the Dean's award for distinguished teaching in 2006. He co-wrote "The Resilience Factor," and "Mequilibrium."

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Learning From The Roman Empire: Are we Repeating Their Rise and Decline?

Caroline Winterer / Stanford University

The rise and fall of ancient Rome is one of the greatest stories in the history of the world. From a group of settlements huddled along the Tiber in Italy, Rome rose to conquer much of the Mediterranean world and Europe. At the height of the Roman Empire, one in every five people in the world lived within its territory.

For Americans, Rome's unlikely ascent, spectacular ambitions, and gruesome decline have provided endless fuel for our national self-examination. Is the United States an empire? Are empires good or bad? What makes great civilizations decline and fall—and how can America avoid that fate? This talk will explore the great American question—"Are We Rome?"—and show why this ancient empire continues to fascinate our very modern nation.

Caroline Winterer / Stanford University
Caroline Winterer is Anthony P. Meier Family Professor in the Humanities at Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Humanities Center. Her latest book, "American Enlightenments: Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason," is being published by Yale University Press in October 2016. She is a recipient of an American Ingenuity Award from the Smithsonian Institution for mapping the social network of Benjamin Franklin, and is also a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians.

12:15 PM - 1:30 PM
Lunch Break

1 hour and 15 minute / Lunch Break

Students will have a 1 hour and 15 minute lunch break.

1:30 PM - 2:45 PM
Reinventing English: The Troubled Future of Reading, Writing and Thinking

Seth Lerer / University of California at San Diego

The English Language is changing at a faster rate than almost ever before. Not only are new words and new expressions entering popular expression; the language is becoming more evocative and idiomatic. Digital technologies have changed the way we write and read. Global media has helped make English into a world language -- but a world language with many different social, regional, and cultural variations. 

Should English be an official language; what standards to we use in public discourse; what happens when cultures come together and introduce new words; what role does technology have in language change? These are all questions that, in one form or another, have been asked for a thousand years -- ever since the Anglo-Saxons first committed “English” into writing and created poetry and prose of power and imagination. English has always been Re-Invented by everyone who speaks and writes it. In this course, we will search for ways of anticipating future changes to the language and prepare for a world in which English will be Re-Invented before our eyes and ears.

Seth Lerer / University of California at San Diego
Seth Lerer is Distinguished Professor of Literature and former Dean of Arts and Humanities at the University of California at San Diego. He has published widely on literature and language, most recently on Children's Literature, Jewish culture, and the life of the theater. He has been awarded the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Truman Capote Prize in Criticism. His memoir, "Prospero's Son: Life, Love, Books, and Theater," appeared in 2013, and his latest book, "Tradition: A Feeling for the Literary Past," appeared in 2016.

3:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Music as a Mirror of History: 300 Years in 60 Minutes

Robert Greenberg / UC Berkeley / SF Performances

This presentation examines Western music as an artistic phenomenon that mirrors the social, political, spiritual and economic realities of its time. As such, the ongoing changes in musical style evident in Western music during the last millennia are a function of large-scale societal change and are not due to any particular composer's "creative muse." Starting with the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and the intellectual and spiritual climate of the High Baroque (ca. 1720), this program will observe the changes wrought by Enlightenment society on the music of the Classical Era (ca. 1780) as manifested in the work of Wolfgang Gottlieb Mozart. This class will observe the impact of the Age of Revolution and Napoleon through a lens provided by the radical and experimental music of Ludwig van Beethoven (ca. 1810).

Other topics to be explored include the nature and conception of "the composer", Beethoven's gastro-intestinal problems (not pretty, but relevant), architecture and landscape design in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and the applicability of the concept of "music as a mirror" to American popular music of the 1950s and 1960s.

Robert Greenberg / UC Berkeley / SF Performances
Robert Greenberg has composed over fifty works for a wide variety of instrumental and vocal ensembles. He has received numerous honors, including being designated an official "Steinway Artist," three Nicola de Lorenzo Composition Prizes and three Meet-The-Composer Grants. Notable commissions have been received from the Koussevitzky Foundation in the Library of Congress, the Alexander String Quartet, the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players, San Francisco Performances, and the XTET ensemble. He has served on the faculties of the University of California at Berkeley, California State University East Bay, and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, where he chaired the Department of Music History and Literature and served as the Director of the Adult Extension Division. The Bangor Daily News referred to Greenberg as 'the Elvis of music appreciation.'"

SOLD OUT!

Sorry this event is sold out.

Please call 1-800-300-3438 to be added to the waiting list.