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One Day University: A Day of History (Minneapolis)

April 08, 2017 9:30 AM – 4:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
America's Founding Fathers: Unique Insights About the Men Who Launched Our Nation

Carol Berkin / Baruch College

Most of us know that America's Founding Father's attended the Constitutional Convention of 1787 in Philadelphia and drafted the Constitution of the United States. The delegates decided to replace the Articles of Confederation with a document that strengthened the federal government, with the most contentious issue being the apportioning of legislative representation. Two plans were presented: the Virginia plan, favored by the large states, apportioned representatives by population or wealth; the New Jersey plan, favored by the small states, provided for equal representation for each state. A compromise established the bicameral Congress to ensure both equal and proportional representation.

But a lot more happened as well - much of it underreported or misunderstood. That's the focus of this insider's look at the birth of American Government as we know it today.

Carol Berkin / Baruch College
Carol Berkin is Presidential Professor of History at Baruch College and a member of the history faculty of the Graduate Center of CUNY. She has worked as a consultant on several PBS and History Channel documentaries, including, The "Scottsboro Boys," which was nominated for an Academy Award as the best documentary of 2000. She has also appeared as a commentator on screen in the PBS series by Ric Burns, "New York," the Middlemarch series "Benjamin Franklin" and "Alexander Hamilton" on PBS, and the MPH series, "The Founding Fathers." She serves on the Board of The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the Board of the National Council for History Education.

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
Three Turning Points That Changed American History

Jeremi Suri / University of Texas

In the relatively short history of the United States, there have been many turning points and landmark movements that irrevocably altered the direction of the nation and signaled the dramatic start of a new historical reality. Some took the form of groundbreaking political and philosophical concepts; some were dramatic military victories and defeats. Still others were nationwide social and religious movements, or technological and scientific innovations.

What all of these turning points had in common, is that they forever changed the character of America. Sometimes the changes brought about by these events were obvious; sometimes they were more subtle. Sometimes the effects of these turning points were immediate; other times, their aftershocks reverberated for decades. Regardless, these great historical turning points demand to be understood.

Jeremi Suri / University of Texas
Jeremi Suri holds the Mack Brown Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a professor in the University's Department of History and the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs. Professor Suri is the author of six books on contemporary politics and foreign policy. His research and teaching have received numerous prizes, and in 2007 Smithsonian Magazine named him one of America's "Top Young Innovators" in the Arts and Sciences.

12:15 PM - 1:30 PM
Lunch Break

1 hour and 15 minute / Lunch Break

Students will have a 1 hour and 15 minute lunch break.

1:30 PM - 2:45 PM
Lying in America: A 250 Year History

Jeffrey Hancock / Stanford University

Let's face it: people lie. We lie to each other and to ourselves. How is the rewiring of communication in the digital revolution changing how we lie? How can we trust that online review, or that text message about someone being on their way?

In this talk we'll go over the state-of-the-art in deception detection research on how to spot a liar online, explore some new forms of deception, and examine how different technologies affect both how we lie and how we trust online. The talk reveals several key principles that can guide how we can think about deception and truth in this new digital age.

Jeffrey Hancock / Stanford University
Jeffrey Hancock is a Professor of Communications at Stanford University. He was the Chair of the Information Science Department, and the co-Director of Cognitive Science at Cornell University. He is interested in social interactions mediated by information and communication technology, with an emphasis on how people produce and understand language in these contexts. His TED Talk on deception has been seen over 1 million times and he has been featured as a guest on "CBS This Morning" for his expertise on social media.

3:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Rhapsody in Blue: The Musical Masterpiece That Changed America

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University

Gershwin wrote his first hit songs at the age of 19, and was a successful songwriter from then on. He created concert works out of melodies and rhythms that come out of the popular music of his day - Broadway ballads, ragtime, Latin dance rhythms, and the Blues. Professor Grossman's lecture will demonstrate the unique way Gershwin composed, including his very first and most popular concert work, Rhapsody in Blue. And yes – Professor Grossman (who is a concert level pianist) will play excerpts from that American masterpiece.

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University
Orin Grossman is renowned internationally for his knowledge of music. He lectures and performs concerts throughout the US and Europe, he teaches Performing Arts at Fairfield University, and has served as the University's Academic Vice President. Professor Grossman has been particularly associated with the music of George Gershwin, performing concerts of his song transcriptions and classical pieces to critical praise around the world, including performances in Cairo and New York. Professor Grossman was also chosen to play for the New York City Mayor's Awards of Honor for Arts and Culture.

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