New Classes. New Cities. Discounts and More!

One Day University with The Kansas City Star

October 07, 2017 9:30 AM – 4:15 PM

Parking will be $10 for the full day at the Nelson Atkins Museum.

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Hamilton vs. Jefferson: The Rivalry that Shaped America

Louis Masur / Rutgers University

Hamilton is experiencing a well-deserved revival. Often forced to take a back seat to other Founding Fathers, his vision of America as an economic powerhouse with a dynamic and aggressive government as its engine has found many followers. Hamilton helped get the Constitution ratified, helped found the Federalist Party, and served as the first Secretary of the Treasury. An orphan born in the West Indies, he was like a son to George Washington and perhaps should have been like a brother to Thomas Jefferson.

But Jefferson fought bitterly against the Federalists and his election as president ushered in the "revolution of 1800." Ironically, it would be Hamilton who helped assure Jefferson's triumph over Aaron Burr. Jefferson articulated a different vision from Hamilton's, promoting an agrarian democracy built upon geographic expansion—an "empire of liberty," he called it. In 1793, he would resign as Secretary of State to protest Hamilton's policies. In retirement, Jefferson would reflect on the differences between Federalists and Democratic-Republicans and express fear for the future of the new nation.

Louis Masur / Rutgers University
Louis Masur is a Distinguished Professor of American Studies and History at Rutgers University. He received outstanding teaching awards from Rutgers, Trinity College, and the City College of New York, and won the Clive Prize for Excellence in Teaching from Harvard University. He is the author of many books including "Lincoln's Last Speech," which was inspired by a talk he presented at One Day University. His essays and articles have appeared in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Dallas Morning News, and Chicago Tribune. He is an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society and serves on the Historians' Council of the Gettysburg Foundation.

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
The Future of American Elections: What Happens Now?

Sam Potolicchio / Georgetown University

Donald Trump's election marked the most stunning political ascent in American history. Trump violated almost every rule of historical campaign practice and triumphed over both the Republican and Democratic establishments. Treated as an unserious joke just 18 months before his victory, Trump's victory shocked the globe. Why were the pollsters so wrong about his prospects? What were the hidden factors that led to President Trump's upset victory?

Trump's early governance as President has been just as disruptive to the common conventions of the Presidency as were his unorthodox campaign methods. What does his governance mean for the future of Presidency? Will presidential elections change and adjust because of Trump's success? Will this victory usher in a new paradigm of politics and new types of presidential aspirants? And if so, should we change the way we pick presidents?

Sam Potolicchio / Georgetown University
Sam Potolicchio is Director of Global and Custom Education at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. He was named one of "America's Best Professors" by the Princeton Review, and the Future Leader of American Higher Education by the Association of Colleges and Universities. He also serves as the Department Chairman and Distinguished Professor in Political and Social Communications at the School of Public Policy at the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy. Professor Potolicchio is a visiting professor at NYU and an official lecturer at the Library of Congress for OWLC, an international leadership program of the United States Congress.

12:15 PM - 1:30 PM
Lunch Break

1 hour and 15 minute / Lunch Break

Students will have a 1 hour and 15 minute lunch break.

1:30 PM - 2:45 PM
Positive Psychology: The Surprising Science of Happiness and Resilience

Catherine Sanderson / Amherst College

Happiness has been in the news quite a bit lately. The UN released a "Happiness Report" rating nearly 200 countries, which found that the world’s happiest people live in Northern Europe (Denmark, Norway, Finland, and the Netherlands). The US ranked 11th. The report's conclusion affirmatively states that happiness has predictable causes and is correlated specifically to various measures that governments can regulate and encourage. And there's more. A new AARP study looks at how Americans feel - and what factors contribute to their sense of contentment. It concludes that nearly 50% of us are "somewhat happy" and another 19% are "very happy." 

What role do money, IQ, marriage, friends, children, weather, and religion play in making us feel happier? Is happiness stable over time? How can happiness be increased? Professor Sanderson will describe cutting-edge research from the field of positive psychology on the factors that do (and do not) predict happiness, and provide practical (and relatively easy!) ways to increase your own psychological well-being.

Catherine Sanderson / Amherst College
Catherine Sanderson is the Manwell Family Professor of Psychology at Amherst College. Her research has received grant funding from the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Health. Professor Sanderson has published over 25 journal articles and book chapters in addition to four college textbooks, a high school health textbook, and a popular press book on parenting. In 2012, she was named one of the country's top 300 professors by the Princeton Review. Professor Sanderson speaks regularly for public and corporate audiences on topics such as the science of happiness, the power of emotional intelligence, the mind-body connection, and the psychology of good and evil. More information on these talks is available on her website: SandersonSpeaking.com.

3:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Three Musical Masterpieces That Every Music Lover Should Listen To

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University

Ezra Pound famously wrote, "Literature is news that stays news." We might say the same for the great masterpieces of music. There are works from the great composers who speak to us with the freshness and excitement of anything seemingly more contemporary and relevant. As long as we bring an open mind, or open ears, we can discover beauty, meaning, and emotional depth undimmed by the passage of time.

In this class, Professor Grossman will present three remarkable musical works from the same period, by musicians young and old, at the peak of their composing careers. All three share energy and passion of youth, and the excitement of ushering in or extending a new musical era. And yet these compositions could not be more different than if they had been written hundreds of years apart. Individually, they each speak to us about the power of musical expression; together they illustrate how many ways music can excite the imagination. The three compositions are: 1) Ludwig van Beethoven, Fifth Symphony, 2) Frederic Chopin, Ballade #1 for Piano, and 3) Professor Grossman's acclaimed finale (which he has performed all around the world!) George Gershwin, Rhapsody in Blue.

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University
Orin Grossman is renowned internationally for his knowledge of music. He lectures and performs concerts throughout the US and Europe, he teaches Performing Arts at Fairfield University, and has served as the University's Academic Vice President. Professor Grossman has been particularly associated with the music of George Gershwin, performing concerts of his song transcriptions and classical pieces to critical praise around the world, including performances in Cairo and New York. Professor Grossman was also chosen to play for the New York City Mayor's Awards of Honor for Arts and Culture.

SOLD OUT!

Sorry this event is sold out.

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