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One Day University with the Richmond Times-Dispatch

March 03, 2018 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
Problem Framing: A Guide to Making Good Decisions

Paul Bracken / Yale University School of Management

Whether it's to start a new project, make a career move, buy a new house, or pretty much anything you can think of - there's a pattern for success. Learn to "frame the problem," analyze the information, choose a solution, and, finally, execute.

Using the widely acclaimed Yale Problem Framing course, we start with a business focus and highlight the difference between operations and strategy, and seeing the customer's viewpoint. Then we learn how these traditional business practices can be adapted to everyday life. The difference between a good decision and a bad one can be literally life changing. Isn't it a good idea to "invest" an hour to take advantage of this opportunity?

Paul Bracken / Yale University School of Management
Paul Bracken is a leading expert in global competition and the strategic application of technology in business and defense. Professor Bracken is consistently rated as one of the top executive education teachers in the world, bringing together practical as well as academic perspectives. He is a consultant to private equity funds, accounting, and insurance companies as well as several arms of the U.S. Government. A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, he is included in Princeton Review's book, "The Best 300 Professors in America." He has served on the Chief of Naval Operations Executive Panel, and has co-chaired the Board of Advisors of the U.S. Naval War College and the Naval Postgraduate School.

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
Ethical Dilemmas and Modern Medicine: Questions Nobody Wants to Ask

Jacob Appel / Brown University

The same medical technologies that have brought us miracle drugs and unprecedented longevity are also forcing us to confront increasingly difficult ethical dilemmas: Should taxpayers spend several million dollars to prolong one patient's life for one month? Can genes be patented? How ought judges respond when doctors and family members disagree on the very definition of death? May a seventeen-year-old boy refuse to give a life-saving bone marrow transplant to his fifteen-year-old cousin? Thirty years ago, debates in medical ethics focused on the same questions that had once puzzled Hippocrates and Galen many centuries earlier: When does life begin? When may confidentiality be broken? Must a physician help a stranger in need?

Today, most challenges in bioethics arise from two relatively novel sets of issues: 1.) conflicts over scarce healthcare resources and 2.) the desire of philosophical and religious minorities to be opt out of established medical norms. How society ultimately resolves these questions is not simply an abstract matter for debate by philosophers and ethicists. Rather, the outcome of these controversies is likely to affect each and every one of us when we or our loved ones become ill. This lecture will examine some paradigmatic recent cases in the field of bioethics and will offer students a framework for analyzing future cases on their own.

Jacob Appel / Brown University
Jacob Appel is an American author, bioethicist, physician, lawyer and social critic. He is best known for his short stories, his work as a playwright, and his writing in the fields of reproductive ethics, organ donation, neuroethics and euthanasia. Appel's novel, The Man Who Wouldn't Stand Up, won the Dundee International Book Prize in 2012. He has taught medical ethics at New York University, Columbia University, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and Brown University's Alpert Medical School.

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
The Science of Stress and Sleep: How they Affect Creativity, Focus, and Memory

Jessica Payne / University of Notre Dame

What's going on in your head while you sleep? The research of Notre Dame Professor Jessica Payne shows that the non-waking hours are incredibly valuable for your day-to-day life, especially for helping to commit information to memory and for problem solving. If you ever thought sleep was just downtime between one task and the next, think again.The fact is, your brain pulls an all-nighter when you hit the hay. Many regions of the brain - especially those involved in learning, processing information, and emotion - are actually more active during sleep than when you're awake. These regions are working together while you sleep, helping you process and sort information you've taken in during the course of the day. Professor Payne's research has focused on what types of information are submitted to memory, and has been instrumental in better understanding how the brain stores the information. 

Sound interesting? It is. And useful too, as Professor Payne will outline all sorts of practical information on how to control your sleep habits to insure maximum productivity.

Jessica Payne / University of Notre Dame
Jessica Payne is the Nancy O'Neill Collegiate Chair and Professor of Psychology at the University of Notre Dame, where she directs the Sleep, Stress, and Memory Lab. Her course, The Sleeping Brain, routinely sports a waitlist because of its immense popularity among Notre Dame students. In 2012, Professor Payne received the Frank O'Malley Undergraduate Teaching Award. She is also a two-time recipient of the Distinction in Teaching Award, and won the Award for Teaching Excellence at Harvard University's Derek Bok Center.

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