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One Day University with The Baltimore Sun

April 07, 2018 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
Three Paintings Every Art Lover Should See

Tina Rivers Ryan / Columbia University and Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo)

If you had to name the three most important paintings in Western artthe ones that most influenced the course of art, or history, or bothwhat would they be? (Mona Lisa, anybody?) While a fun exercise, when it comes to understanding art, ranking paintings in this way doesn't help us answer the more profound question of why art, and especially painting, has been so important to Western culture for hundreds of years. In other words, instead of trying to identify the three "most important" paintingsan impossible task, to be surewhat if we picked five paintings that helped us understand the different ways that painting can be used as a meaningful form of communication? These paintings would come from different time periods, genres, and nations, and would outline the different ways that painting has played an important role in Western culture.

These, therefore, are three paintings every art lover should see if they want to understand more about the history and significance of paintingand its continued relevance to our lives.

Our three paintings will be:

  • Jan van Eyck's Arnolfini Portrait, 1434 (National Gallery, London)
  • Raphael's School of Athens, 1509-10 (Vatican, Rome)
  • Rembrandt's Self-Portrait, 1658 (Frick Collection, NYC)

Tina Rivers Ryan / Columbia University and Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo)
An art historian by training, Dr. Tina Rivers Ryan is currently Assistant Curator of contemporary art at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York. She holds a BA from Harvard, three Master's Degrees, and a PhD from Columbia, and has taught classes on art at institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, the Pratt Institute, and Columbia, where she was one of the top-ranked instructors of the introduction to art history, "Art Humanities: Masterpieces of Western Art." A regular critic for Artforum, her writing has also appeared in periodicals such as Art in America and Art Journal, and in catalogs published by museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center, and the Tate. As a public speaker and scholar, Dr. Ryan has delivered lectures on topics ranging from Michelangelo to Warhol in more than 50 cities internationally.

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
The Civil War and Abraham Lincoln: What's Fact and What's Fiction?

Louis Masur / Rutgers University

Abraham Lincoln is considered our greatest President and one of the most controversial. People have debated various aspects of his personality and politics. Was he depressed? Why did he tell so many stories? Was he truly opposed to slavery? Did he free the slaves? Did the Union prevail because of his leadership or despite him? This class aims to uncover the man and not the myth. In 1922, the historian W.E.B. DuBois proclaimed that Lincoln was “big enough to be inconsistent.” To be sure, there were tensions in Lincoln’s character and ideology: he could be happy and melancholy, could promote democracy and suspend civil liberties, could oppose slavery yet have doubts about the place of blacks in American society.

Some of what DuBois saw as inconsistency had more to do with political reality, especially in regard to the issue of the abolition of slavery. Lincoln had to contend with various pressures knowing that any misstep could very well lead to the destruction of the Union. Here is where his temperament becomes so important. As we shall see, Lincoln’s storytelling had a purpose, as did his gradual approach to decision making. But once he made up his mind, he seldom looked back. In the end, it is not that he was inconsistent, but that he was thoughtful and deliberate and was not afraid to change his mind and grow in the process.

Louis Masur / Rutgers University
Louis Masur is a Distinguished Professor of American Studies and History at Rutgers University. He received outstanding teaching awards from Rutgers, Trinity College, and the City College of New York, and won the Clive Prize for Excellence in Teaching from Harvard University. He is the author of many books including "Lincoln's Last Speech," which was inspired by a talk he presented at One Day University. His essays and articles have appeared in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Dallas Morning News, and Chicago Tribune. He is an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society and serves on the Historians' Council of the Gettysburg Foundation.

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
Four Dilemmas of Modern Medicine

Jeffrey Kahn / Johns Hopkins University

In this lecture, Professor Kahn will examine the state of health care and biomedical research in the U.S. and around the globe, through the lens of ethics. The lecture will start with some historical context and examples from bioethics, and draw some parallels from the past for the current state of our public discussions on a range of controversial bioethics issues.

Topics will include the practices of research involving patients as well as healthy subjects, the debates about the beginning and end of life, reproductive technologies, transplantation, and the latest cutting edge research in genetics and genomics.

Jeffrey Kahn / Johns Hopkins University
Jeffrey Kahn is the Andreas C. Dracopoulos Director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. He is the inaugural Robert Henry Levi and Ryda Hecht Levi Professor of Bioethics and Public Policy. Professor Kahn was the founding president of the Association of Bioethics Program Directors, and is an elected Fellow of The Hastings Center. His publications include "Contemporary Issues in Bioethics," "Beyond Consent: Seeking Justice in Research," and "Ethics of Research With Human Subjects: Selected Policies and Resources."

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