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One Day University with The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

April 29, 2018 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

 

Please go to toronto.onedayu.com to purchase your tickets.

 

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
Is that Really Art? Understanding and Appreciating Modern Painting

Tina Rivers Ryan / Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo), Formerly Columbia University

Here's a question that all art lovers today have had to ask themselves: How do you look at a painting of a woman made of geometric shapes and shadows? What about a canvas painted a single, solid color? Or covered in paint drips? Or printed with a photographic image? Do any of these really count as "art," let alone as "paintings?" And how do you know which ones are "good?" 

The key to answering these questions is to understand that modern art is a conversation, a dialogue between artists about the very nature of art that has been going on for generations. In this talk, we will look closely at four paintings, culled from the movements of Cubism, Constructivism, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop, in order to understand how artists in different times and places have explored these fundamental issues in their work. After learning to look at these modern works, we will consider whether this conversation is still unfolding: are we still making "modern" art, or did modernism end, giving way to something altogether different?

Tina Rivers Ryan / Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo), Formerly Columbia University
An art historian by training, Dr. Tina Rivers Ryan is currently Assistant Curator of contemporary art at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York. She holds a BA from Harvard, three Master's Degrees, and a PhD from Columbia, and has taught classes on art at institutions including the Museum of Modern Art, the Pratt Institute, and Columbia, where she was one of the top-ranked instructors of the introduction to art history, "Art Humanities: Masterpieces of Western Art." A regular critic for Artforum, her writing has also appeared in periodicals such as Art in America and Art Journal, and in catalogs published by museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center, and the Tate. As a public speaker and scholar, Dr. Ryan has delivered lectures on topics ranging from Michelangelo to Warhol in more than 50 cities internationally.

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
The Five Most Powerful People in the World

William Burke-White / University of Pennsylvania

Who are the real influencers on the world stage? Who makes the decisions that determine war and peace? Economic growth or stagnation? Global cooperation or political stagnation? 

This lecture answers those questions by examining how we think about power and influence in international politics. We will consider traditional answers based on military might and examine how globalization, technology, ideology, and economic interdependence are changing the ways we should think about power and influence.

After engaging in an analysis of power and influence in today’s world, we will consider 5 particular individuals—some expected, others perhaps unexpected or even unknown—who are calling the shots in global affairs today. The lecture concludes with a detailed look at what their influence means for our global future.

William Burke-White / University of Pennsylvania
William Burke-White is the Richard Perry Professor and Inaugural Director of the Perry World House at the University of Pennsylvania. He served in the Obama Administration from 2009-2011 on Secretary Clinton's Policy Planning Staff. He was also principal drafter of the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review, Secretary Clinton's hallmark foreign policy and institutional reform effort. Professor Burke-White has received the Levin Award and the Gorman award for Excellence in Teaching.

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
What We Know About the Universe (and What We Don't Know)

David Helfand / Columbia University

Astronomy is unlike other sciences in that there are no experiments we can perform or expeditions we can mount to manipulate the objects of our study. We are reduced to passively observing the light the Universe sends us, some of which has traveled billions of years before falling on our telescopes. Because the light takes so long to get to us, we are always seeing the past. Far from being a disadvantage, however, this allows us to read history directly by looking out to objects at different distances. 

We can watch stars being born, living out their lives, and then dying in spectacular explosions that produce the elements from which we are made. We can watch how galaxies form and grow by gobbling up their neighbors. And we can map the nearest million galaxies and trace them back to the tiny fluctuations in the early Universe from which they emerged. Replete with colliding galaxies and a fly-through of the Universe set to the Blue Danube waltz, this lecture provides one-stop shopping for a comprehensive tour of all of space and time -- or at least of the whole 4% we actually understand.

David Helfand / Columbia University
David Helfand is a Professor of Astronomy at Columbia University where he served as chair of the Department and co-Director of the Astrophysics Laboratory for 15 years. He is also the former President of the American Astronomical Society and of Quest University Canada. He has received the Columbia Presidential Teaching Award and the Great Teacher Award from the Society of Columbia Graduates. He is also the author of the new book, "A Survival Guide to the Misinformation Age."

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