New Classes. New Cities. Discounts and More!

One Day University with The Denver Post

March 10, 2019 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
The Supreme Court: What's Next and Why it Matters

Alison Gash / University of Oregon

Few at the Founding could have ever imagined the Supreme Court becoming one of the most powerful policymaking institutions in the United States. Yet today, the Court has the power to sidestep public opinion, upend federal legislation, constrain state governance, and even bring down the President. Professor Alison Gash will take us back to the Court's humble beginnings, charting how the Court amassed its power. As we walk through the Court's history, meandering through landmark decisions, she will use her research on law and social policy to highlight the importance of understanding the Court not only as a legal actor but also as a significant source of policy innovation and paralysis. Through this lens, Professor Gash will demonstrate why the Court's makeup--its personalities and its relationships--can make or break American public policy.

Professor Gash will also discuss in some detail the recent hard fought confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court and whether the politics of Kavanaugh's and other recent Court nominations may well end up eroding the "checking" capacity of the Court. Professor Gash will discuss the Kavanaugh nomination within the context of increasing partisan discord over Supreme Court nominations and the implications of this increased partisanship on the Court's ability to "put politics aside" when adjudicating over specific cases or upholding "the rule of law." As she will discuss, the founding fathers went to great lengths to insulate the federal judiciary from the passions of partisanship and majority will in order to preserve its power to hold politics accountable to a more durable set of principles and values. To what degree will this be damaged if Court nominations and nominees become vulnerable to the same partisan strife that characterizes the political world? If that happens, who will check politics?

Alison Gash / University of Oregon
Alison Gash is a political science professor at the University of Oregon, where she has received several fellowships and grants for her teaching. She specializes in US Supreme Court and civil rights laws. Professor Gash has also taught at Berkeley, where she received the Commendation for Excellence in Teaching two years in a row. She is the author of "Below the Radar: How Silence Can Save Civil Rights." Her work has appeared in Newsweek, Slate, Politico, and Washington Monthly.

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
The Human Brain: What We Know (and what we don't)

David Eagleman / Stanford University

Locked in the silence and darkness of your skull, your brain fashions the rich narratives of your reality and your identity. Join renowned neuroscientist David Eagleman for a journey into the questions at the mysterious heart of our existence. What is reality? Who are "you"? How do you make decisions? If the conscious mind—the part you consider you—accounts for only a fraction of the brain's function, what is all the rest doing?

These are some of the questions that Dr. Eagleman has spent years researching and which he answers in this eye-opening class. Our behavior, thoughts, and experiences are inseparably linked to a vast, wet, chemical-electrical network called the nervous system. The machinery is utterly alien to us, and yet, somehow, it is us. Eagleman takes us into the depths of the subconscious to answer some of our deepest mysteries. He charts new terrain in neuroscience and helps us understand how our perceptions of ourselves and our world result from the hidden workings of the most wondrous thing we have ever discovered: the human brain.

David Eagleman / Stanford University
David Eagleman is a neuroscientist, an adjunct professor at Stanford University, and a New York Times bestselling author. He is the writer and presenter of the international PBS series, "The Brain with David Eagleman." He is a TED speaker, a Guggenheim Fellow, an advisor to HBO's Westworld, a winner of the McGovern Award for Excellence in Biomedical Communication, a research fellow in the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, Chief Scientific Advisor for the Mind Science Foundation, and a board member of The Long Now Foundation. He was named Science Educator of the Year by the Society for Neuroscience.

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
Four Memorable Musicals That Changed Broadway

Sean Hartley / Kaufman Music Center

Hamilton made history not long ago by receiving a grand total of 16 nominations for last year's Tony Awards – ultimately winning a total of 11, including Best Musical. The phenomenon is part of a long lineage of musical theater productions that capture the public's attention and reflects the culture surrounding it. Broadway combines the thrill of live music with the compelling storytelling and drama of watching a movie or TV show and, when done with incredible care and sensitivity, the combination of the two can lead to something transformative.

Sean Hartley / Kaufman Music Center
Sean Hartley is the director at the Kaufman Music Center's Theater Wing, the chair of the SMS Admissions Assessment Committee, and on the faculty of the SMS Chorus and LMS Dalcroze. He is the Producer/Host of Broadway Close Up as well as Broadway Playhouse. Sean is also a playwright, composer, an lyricist: Cupid And Psyche (Drama Desk nomination,) Little Women; Snow (ASCAP Harold Arlen Award.); Leaving Home.

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