New Classes. New Cities. Discounts and More!

One Day University in Fairfield, CT

March 16, 2019 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
How To Listen To (And Appreciate) Great Music

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University

We all love some form of music, but we will love it even more when we learn how to listen more closely. The way a piece or a song moves us is ultimately what makes music lovers come back for more. However, the ease with which we can hear any type of music today and the endless outlets for different kinds of music creates the problem of over-saturation. We have become passive listeners, tuning most sounds out and are often unable to participate in a more active style of listening. At the heart of appreciating great music is the concept of active listening—becoming more attuned to the communication from the composer and performer to the listener.

This class will explain and demonstrate the concept of active listening and provide techniques to get more pleasure from great music reflecting a wide variety of styles. We will focus on melody and the different ways melodies can create meaning in music; we will listen to excerpts of music from the classical, jazz, and popular traditions in order to "stretch our ears" and get more pleasure from the musical experience.

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University
Orin Grossman is renowned internationally for his knowledge of music. He lectures and performs concerts throughout the US and Europe, he teaches Performing Arts at Fairfield University, and has served as the University's Academic Vice President. Professor Grossman has been particularly associated with the music of George Gershwin, performing concerts of his song transcriptions and classical pieces to critical praise around the world, including performances in Cairo and New York. Professor Grossman was also chosen to play for the New York City Mayor's Awards of Honor for Arts and Culture.

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
The Science of Sleep and Stress: How they Affect Creativity, Focus, and Memory

Jessica Payne / University of Notre Dame

What's going on in your head while you sleep? The research of Notre Dame Professor Jessica Payne shows that the non-waking hours are incredibly valuable for your day-to-day life, especially for helping to commit information to memory and for problem solving. If you ever thought sleep was just downtime between one task and the next, think again. The fact is, your brain pulls an all-nighter when you hit the hay. Many regions of the brain - especially those involved in learning, processing information, and emotion - are actually more active during sleep than when you're awake. These regions are working together while you sleep, helping you process and sort information you've taken in during the course of the day. Professor Payne's research has focused on what types of information are submitted to memory, and has been instrumental in better understanding how the brain stores the information. 

Sound interesting? It is. And useful too, as Professor Payne will outline all sorts of practical information on how to control your sleep habits to insure maximum productivity.

Jessica Payne / University of Notre Dame
Jessica Payne is the Nancy O'Neill Collegiate Chair and Professor of Psychology at the University of Notre Dame, where she directs the Sleep, Stress, and Memory Lab. Her course, The Sleeping Brain, routinely sports a waitlist because of its immense popularity among Notre Dame students. In 2012, Professor Payne received the Frank O'Malley Undergraduate Teaching Award. She is also a two-time recipient of the Distinction in Teaching Award, and won the Award for Teaching Excellence at Harvard University's Derek Bok Center.

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
American Power: Dominance or Decline? An Insider's Look at Global Developments

Stephen Kotkin / Princeton University

Globalization has blurred the distinction between domestic and foreign policy and it has increased our vulnerability in many policy areas. Yet, most Americans remain dangerously disinterested in foreign affairs. So, with a political system that is hopelessly polarized, what role will the US play in the world in the next few years? Will we control the agenda, cooperate and shape the agenda with our core allies or will we gradually withdraw from our role as the leading nation-state in global affairs?

In this lecture we will review the strategies and traditions that have shaped U.S. foreign policy since the end of Cold War and we will review the key challenges our leaders will face in the next few years.

Stephen Kotkin / Princeton University
Stephen Kotkin is the John P. Birkelund Professor in History and International Affairs at Princeton. Professor Kotkin established the department's Global History workshop. He serves on the core editorial committee of the journal, World Politics. He founded and edits a book series on Northeast Asia. From 2003 until 2007, he was a member and then chair of the editorial board at Princeton University Press, and is a regular book reviewer for the New York Times Sunday Business section.

register now

$159.00

for the event

To register for this event, please

If you already have an account, please