New Classes. New Cities. Discounts and More!

One Day University with the Minneapolis Star Tribune

March 23, 2019 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
Overcoming Adversity: Why Some People Can and Others Cannot

Andrew Shatte / University of Arizona

In this fast-paced, interactive, and fun session Dr. Andrew Shatté will lead you on a tour of the big questions in the psychology of resilience. Why does one person overcome adversity while another falls into helplessness? What are the 7 ingredients that make up resilience - and do you have them?

We will see that habits in how we think have an enormous impact on resilience. You will gain insight into two of your thinking styles and learn about the impact they can have on your success, happiness, and health. Dr. Shatté will show you how to boost resilience with case studies from his work in large corporations and the public sector. And in the final moments of the workshop, he'll even reveal the biggest secret to a life of resilience!

Andrew Shatte / University of Arizona
Andrew Shatté teaches psychology at the University of Arizona, and is also the founder and President of Mindflex, a training company that specializes in measuring and training for resilience. Professor Shatté first joined One Day University when he was a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was given the "Best Professor" award by the students in 2003 and received the Dean's award for distinguished teaching in 2006. He co-wrote "The Resilience Factor," and "Mequilibrium."

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
The Shifting Lens of History: How We Reimagine the Past

Stephanie Yuhl / College of the Holy Cross

From the kiss in Times Square to "Rosie the Riveter" to "Saving Private Ryan," Americans tend to cherish their memories of WWII as "the best war ever." Yet the Vietnam War remains controversial and brings up an entirely different set of images – from anti-war protests to Agent Orange to the film, "Born on the Fourth of July." What helps explain these radically different understandings of two wars only twenty years apart? Of course, things get even more interesting when we take into consideration the historical memories of the other nations involved in these conflicts.

In this course, we will examine how different societies remember these wars and what those memories might tell us about national hopes and values, about generational change, and even about decisions regarding the military. Animating this presentation is the notion that history is different from the past – it is the often contested way that the past is remembered in the present.

Stephanie Yuhl / College of the Holy Cross
Stephanie Yuhl is a Professor of History at the College of the Holy Cross. She is a recipient of the Fletcher M. Green and Charles W. Ramsdell Award for the best article published in the Journal of Southern History, as well as the Inaugural Burns Career Teaching Medal for Outstanding Teaching. Professor Yuhl is also an Associate at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in the Critical Conservation Program, and an expert in twentieth-century US cultural and social history, with specialities in historical memory, social movements, gender, and Southern history. She is the author of the award-winning book, "A Golden Haze of Memory: The Making of Historic Charleston."

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
The Constitution: Enduring Myths and Hidden Truths

Andrew Porwancher / University of Oklahoma

Amid the heat of a Philadelphia summer in 1787, the delegates of the Constitutional Convention gathered to save a fledgling republic whose very existence was mired in doubt. Americans had waged a bloody war against their mother country a decade earlier to win their independence. Now, as the delegates debated the contours of a new frame of government, they were all too aware that if they failed, the people might once again take up arms. At this pivotal moment in history, the delegates drafted a Constitution that endures today as the oldest surviving national charter still in effect anywhere in the world.

But what did the framers really mean? Did they intend the Establishment Clause to merely ban a national religion or completely separate church and state? Was the Second Amendment designed to protect the rights of individuals or just militias? How much do we actually know about what transpired in Independence Hall? What myths were later invented and accepted as law? The surprising answers to these questions matter, not only for uncovering the truth about our history but for rethinking the laws that govern our lives today.

Andrew Porwancher / University of Oklahoma
Andrew Porwancher is the Wick Cary Associate Professor at the University of Oklahoma, where he teaches constitutional history. He has degrees from Cambridge, Brown, and Northwestern, and has held fellowships at Oxford, Yeshiva, and Princeton. Dr. Porwancher is also the recipient of the Longmire Prize for innovative teaching. His third book, "The Jewish Founding Father: Alexander Hamilton's Hidden Life", will be published by Harvard University Press.

SOLD OUT!

Sorry this event is sold out.

Please call 1-800-300-3438 to be added to the waiting list.