New Classes. New Cities. Discounts and More!

One Day University with the Hartford Courant

February 23, 2019 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

This event is sold out, but on March 16th we'll be in Fairfield, CT with another great event! Classes and professors are different, but just as impressive.

Click here to see the schedule, and use code FCT to sign up with a $40 discount.

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
Four Trials That Changed America

Austin Sarat / Amherst College

Even if we know little about the law, most of us know something about one of law's great rituals, the trial. We are regularly fascinated when this or that legal case is played out in a courtroom and proclaimed in the media to be "the trial of the century." Courtroom contests pit good versus evil, right versus wrong. But, in addition to their dramatic quality, they also are educational moments, occasions on which some of our most important political and social issues get played out before judge and jury. In this lecture we will consider four trials that changed American history during the twentieth century.

We will start by examining the so called "Scopes Monkey Trial." In this 1925 case, a high school teacher was accused of violating a state law that made it illegal to teach human evolution in public schools. Next we take up the Nuremberg trials, held by Allied forces after World War II to prosecute the leaders of Nazi Germany. Our third trial occurred in 1995 when the state of California prosecuted O.J. Simpson for the murder of his wife. The final of the four trials that changed America occurred four year later when the United States Senate took up the impeachment charges against President Bill Clinton arising out of his conduct during and after his affair with Monica Lewinsky. Each of these trials crystallized crucial issues of the day. And, the decisions reached in each of them had a profound impact well beyond the boundaries of the courtroom. If you are interested in such pressing issues as freedom of speech and religion, the responsibilities of perpetrators of war crimes, the legal treatment of celebrities, and the private lives of public figures, or if you just want to have the fun of revisiting some of the most riveting moments in recent American history, this lecture will give you considerable food for thought.

Austin Sarat / Amherst College
Austin Sarat is William Nelson Cromwell professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science at Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts. He has written, co-written, or edited more than ninety books in the fields of law and political science. Professor Sarat has received the the Stan Wheeler Award for his excellence as a teacher and mentor, awarded by the Law and Society Association.

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
American Immigration: Fear, Myth, and Reality

Rachel Friedberg / Brown University

The Statue of Liberty is the quintessential symbol of the United States. But as the debate over immigration reform rages in Congress and the media, has the welcome mat worn thin? What does it meant to hold out a beacon to the world's "tired, poor, huddled masses"? Do we welcome immigrants in because of or despite their economic impact on the United States?

Many in the American labor movement contend that immigrants take jobs away from native-born workers and send wages tumbling. But do they really? Drawing on the research into the economic impact of immigration, Rachel Friedberg examines how new immigrants fare in the U.S. labor market, and how they affect the economic well-being of those of us already here.

Rachel Friedberg / Brown University
Rachel Friedberg is a Distinguished Senior Lecturer in Economics at Brown University. Professor Friedberg's research focuses on the labor market performance and assimilation of immigrants in the United States and Israel, the transferability of human capital, and the impact of immigration on native labor market outcomes.

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
Three Films that Changed America

Marc Lapadula / Yale University

While most works of cinema are produced for mass-entertainment and escapism, a peculiar minority have had a profound influence on our culture. Whether intentionally or not, some movies have brought social issues to light, changed laws, forwarded ideologies both good and bad, and altered the course of American history through their resounding impact on society. Renowned Yale Film Professor Marc Lapadula will discuss three films that, for better or worse, made their mark.

The Jazz Singer
I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang
The Graduate

Marc Lapadula / Yale University
Marc Lapadula is a Senior Lecturer in the Film Studies Program at Yale University. He is a playwright, screenwriter and an award-winning film producer. In addition to Yale, Marc has taught at Columbia University's Graduate Film School, created the screenwriting programs at both The University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins where he won Outstanding Teaching awards and has lectured on film, playwriting and conducted highly-acclaimed screenwriting seminars all across the country at notable venues like The National Press Club, The Smithsonian Institution, The Commonwealth Club and The New York Historical Society.

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