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One Day University with The Arizona Republic

February 02, 2019 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
The American Revolution: Remarkable Stories You Never Heard Before

Richard Bell / University of Maryland

The American Revolution is this country’s founding moment. It marks the birth of a nation committed to the promise of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It’s a staple of school and college curriculums and as a result, most people know something about the American Revolution and about the Founding Fathers who signed the Declaration of Independence and led their thirteen colonies into a bold new future as the United States.

But the full story of the American Revolution requires us to look beyond the lives of Washington, Hamilton, Franklin, Adams, and Jefferson. This class focuses on all the things you might not have learned in high school or college about this great struggle for independence. It probes unexpected corners of this sprawling, eight-year war and expands its cast of characters substantially to include the typhoid-ridden immigrant corset-maker who wrote the pamphlet that gave colonists the confidence to believe they could beat Britain; the Massachusetts woman who disguised herself as a man so that she could serve in Washington’s Army; the enslaved stable hand at Mount Vernon who ran off to join the war and who ended up on the other side of the world; and the widow who became the most important Native American leader during the war. Studying their lives and exploits will reveal the breadth and depth of the sacrifices that the colonists made as they worked to turn a small-scale protest over the price of goods like tea into a fight for freedom.

Richard Bell / University of Maryland
Richard Bell is a Professor of History at the University of Maryland. He has served as the Mellon Fellow in American History at Cambridge University, the National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow at the American Antiquarian Society, a Mayer Fellow at the Huntington Library, as a Research Fellow at the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Abolition and Resistance at Yale University, and a Resident Fellow at the John W. Kluge at the Library of Congress. He is also a frequent lecturer and debater on the C-SPAN television network. Professor Bell is the recipient of more than a dozen teaching awards, including the 2017 University System of Maryland Board of Regents Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching.

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
The Psychology of Persuasion

Carolyn Cavanaugh Toft / Arizona State University

How do salespeople get us to part with our money? How do politicians induce us to vote in particular ways? How do our significant others make us engage in certain activities? While we think that we always make decisions after carefully collecting all the pertinent data and exercising rational problem-solving, social psychologists have found that there are a handful of short-cuts that can lead people to say, “yes” to requests that they may not normally agree to.

In this class, Professor Carolyn Cavanaugh Toft will describe several of these tactics of persuasion such as Reciprocity, Commitment and Consistency, Social Proof, Authority, Liking, and Scarcity, as well as the cutting-edge research that demonstrates how these tactics can be used for good--or not-so-good--means. She will also give tips on how to disarm unethical users of these principles.

Carolyn Cavanaugh Toft / Arizona State University
Carolyn Cavanaugh Toft teaches Clinical Psychology at Arizona State University. She is a licensed psychologist who has worked in different clinical settings and supervised doctoral students in the Clinical Psychology program. Dr. Cavanaugh Toft has receieved several teaching awards, including the Sun Devil Athlete Most Influential Professor Award, and the Devils Advocates Excellence in Teaching Award. Most recently, she receieved the Outstanding Lecturer Award from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at ASU. Additionally, she heads up the Early Start program for incoming psychology students.

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
Three Musical Masterpieces That Changed America

Anna Celenza / Georgetown University

Music permeates our lives. Thanks to technology, it is always with us … via the radio, our smart phones, TV commercials, film music, even the streamed music at our local malls and favorite restaurants. Technology has made it easy for us to put music in the background. The goal of this lecture is to bring it front and center again.

As Professor Celenza will demonstrate, music does not simply reflect culture…it changes it. To demonstrate just how such changes come about, she will highlight three musical masterpieces that changed America. These include: a bawdy 18th-century drinking tune that eventually defined American patriotism, a 1930s ballad that fueled the need for the Civil Rights movement, and a 1980s pop album that changed American foreign policy.

Anna Celenza / Georgetown University
Anna Celenza is the Thomas E. Caestecker Professor of Music at Georgetown University. She is the author of several books, including "Jazz Italian Style: From Its Origins in New Orleans to Fascist Italy and Sinatra." In addition to her scholarly work, she has served as a writer/commentator for NPR's Performance Today and published eight award-winning children's books, among them "Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue" and "Duke Ellington's Nutcracker Suite." She has been featured on nationally syndicated radio and TV programs, including the BBC's "Music Matters" and C-Span's "Book TV."

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