New Classes. New Cities. Discounts and More!

One Day University in Atlanta

September 28, 2019 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
The Art of Aging: What Everyone Should Know About Getting Older

Brian Carpenter / Washington University in St. Louis

No matter how old you are, you're aging. You started aging from the moment you were born, and you'll continue aging until the moment you die. That's the brutal, universal fact. But people age differently, as you’ve noticed if you've looked around and compared yourself to your peers. Are you aging better than they are? Worse than they are? In what ways and for what reasons?

In this class we’ll review what biological, psychological, and social research has taught us about growing older. Along the way, we'll discuss what's common with aging (everybody shrinks a little), what's not normal (Alzheimer's is a disease not everyone gets), and key components of successful aging (friends and family are important, but perhaps in different ways). The trajectory of aging gets shaped very early in life, but there are powerful forces that guide it along the way, and steps you can take to maximize your later years.

Brian Carpenter / Washington University in St. Louis
Brian Carpenter is a professor of psychology at Washington University in St. Louis. His primary research interests focus on relationships among older adults, their family members, and their health care providers. In particular, he studies communication among those three parties, with an eye toward developing interventions to improve knowledge and enhance health literacy. Dr. Carpenter teaches courses at the undergraduate and graduate level that address the psychological needs of older adults, with a particular emphasis on end-of-life care and dementia, and has received the David Hadas Teaching Award at Wash U.

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
The Shifting Lens of History: Civil Rights in America

Marcia Chatelain / Georgetown University

When does the civil rights movement start? 1954? 1964? How about 1864? Our understanding of the long struggle for racial justice is a matter of how we frame the past. Many people are familiar with Martin Luther King, Jr.'s oratory, Rosa Parks's defiance, and Muhammad Ali's conscientious objection. Yet, fewer are aware of the ways that Georgia Gilmore's sandwiches, Charlotte Counts's grace, and Mose Wright's courage also advanced the cause of civil rights.

In this lecture, Dr. Chatelain will present different ways of looking at protests, boycotts, marches, and social change by shifting the lens on civil rights. By highlighting the role of women, children, and people not seen as leaders—cooks, maids, and farmers—we find some hidden stories of the critical moments in the transformation of our nation's history. From college students in Spokane, Washington to rabbis in Miami, Florida, Dr. Chatelain will introduce you to an array of unsung heroes.

Marcia Chatelain / Georgetown University
Marcia Chatelain is Associate Professor of History and African American Studies at Georgetown University. The author of South Side Girls: Growing up in the Great Migration, Chatelain is a public voice on the history of African American children, race in America, as well as social movements. She has been quoted in articles in the New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, and the Washington Post, and has appeared on local television and national outlets including C-SPAN, MSNBC, CNN, BBC-America, and PBS. In 2016, Chatelain was named a "Top Influencer in Higher Education," by the Chronicle of Higher Education. She is currently the Eric and Wendy Schmidt Fellow at the New America Foundation in Washington, D.C.

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
Three Films that Changed America

Marc Lapadula / Yale University

While most works of cinema are produced for mass-entertainment and escapism, a peculiar minority have had a profound influence on our culture. Whether intentionally or not, some movies have brought social issues to light, changed laws, forwarded ideologies both good and bad, and altered the course of American history through their resounding impact on society. Renowned Yale Film Professor Marc Lapadula will discuss three films that, for better or worse, made their mark.

The Jazz Singer
I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang
The Graduate

Marc Lapadula / Yale University
Marc Lapadula is a Senior Lecturer in the Film Studies Program at Yale University. He is a playwright, screenwriter and an award-winning film producer. In addition to Yale, Marc has taught at Columbia University's Graduate Film School, created the screenwriting programs at both The University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins where he won Outstanding Teaching awards and has lectured on film, playwriting and conducted highly-acclaimed screenwriting seminars all across the country at notable venues like The National Press Club, The Smithsonian Institution, The Commonwealth Club and The New York Historical Society.

register now

$159.00

for the event

To register for this event, please

If you already have an account, please