New Classes. New Cities. Discounts and More!

One Day University with The Baltimore Sun

November 09, 2019 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
The Shifting Lens of History: How We Reimagine the Past

Stephanie Yuhl / College of the Holy Cross

From the kiss in Times Square to "Rosie the Riveter" to "Saving Private Ryan," Americans tend to cherish their memories of WWII as "the best war ever." Yet the Vietnam War remains controversial and brings up an entirely different set of images – from anti-war protests to Agent Orange to the film, "Born on the Fourth of July." What helps explain these radically different understandings of two wars only twenty years apart? Of course, things get even more interesting when we take into consideration the historical memories of the other nations involved in these conflicts.

In this course, we will examine how different societies remember these wars and what those memories might tell us about national hopes and values, about generational change, and even about decisions regarding the military. Animating this presentation is the notion that history is different from the past – it is the often contested way that the past is remembered in the present.

Stephanie Yuhl / College of the Holy Cross
Stephanie Yuhl is a Professor of History at the College of the Holy Cross. She is a recipient of the Fletcher M. Green and Charles W. Ramsdell Award for the best article published in the Journal of Southern History, as well as the Inaugural Burns Career Teaching Medal for Outstanding Teaching. Professor Yuhl is also an Associate at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in the Critical Conservation Program, and an expert in twentieth-century US cultural and social history, with specialities in historical memory, social movements, gender, and Southern history. She is the author of the award-winning book, "A Golden Haze of Memory: The Making of Historic Charleston."

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
What We Know About the Universe (and What We Don't Know)

David Helfand / Columbia University

All the colors of the rainbow are but a tiny fraction of the "colors" of light the Universe sends us. Over the past 75 years, astronomers have been busy opening new windows on the cosmos by building telescopes and cameras that allow us to see all of these colors, revealing new phenomena previously unimagined. Very recently, we have opened entirely new channels of information by detecting gravity waves and by seeing the unseeable: directly imaging black holes. All of these messengers from the cosmos travel at the velocity of light, but even at this enormous speed, they take millions, or even billions of years to reach us. As a consequence, we are always seeing the past. Far from being a disadvantage, however, this allows us to read our history directly by looking out to objects at different distances.

We can watch stars being born, living out their lives, and then dying in spectacular explosions that produce the elements from which we are made as well as neutron stars and black holes. We can watch how galaxies form and grow by gobbling up their neighbors. And we can map the nearest million galaxies and trace them back to the tiny fluctuations in the early Universe from which they emerged. Replete with colliding galaxies and a fly-through of the Universe set to the Blue Danube waltz, this lecture provides one-stop shopping for a comprehensive tour of all of space and time -- or at least of the whole 4% we actually understand.

David Helfand / Columbia University
David Helfand has been a Professor of Astronomy at Columbia University for 42 years where he served as chair of the Department for nearly half that time. He is also the former President of the American Astronomical Society and of Quest University Canada, and currently serves as Chair of the American Institute of Physics. He has received the Columbia Presidential Teaching Award and the Great Teacher Award from the Society of Columbia Graduates. He is the author of the new book, "A Survival Guide to the Misinformation Age."

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
Four Memorable Musicals That Changed Broadway

Sean Hartley / Kaufman Music Center

Hamilton made history not long ago by receiving a grand total of 16 nominations for Tony Awards – ultimately winning a total of 11, including Best Musical. The phenomenon is part of a long lineage of musical theater productions that capture the public's attention and reflects the culture surrounding it. Broadway combines the thrill of live music with the compelling storytelling and drama of watching a movie or TV show and, when done with incredible care and sensitivity, the combination of the two can lead to something transformative.

Sean Hartley / Kaufman Music Center
Sean Hartley is the director at the Kaufman Music Center's Theater Wing, the chair of the SMS Admissions Assessment Committee, and on the faculty of the SMS Chorus and LMS Dalcroze. He is the Producer/Host of Broadway Close Up as well as Broadway Playhouse. Sean is also a playwright, composer, and lyricist: Cupid And Psyche (Drama Desk nomination,) Little Women; Snow (ASCAP Harold Arlen Award.); Leaving Home. He is in residence at the Hermitage Artist Retreat in Sarasota.

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