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DO NOT USE: One Day University with the Star Tribune

February 24, 2018 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM

morning session

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Evolution of an American Ideal

Jeffrey Engel / Southern Methodist University

The United States stands for freedom. No politician dares say otherwise, lest they seek an early retirement. But what kind of freedom, precisely, and for whom? Franklin Roosevelt offered an answer in 1941. Believing the United States had a role to play in the battle against Nazi and fascist aggression already underway in Europe, he called Americans to arms not just to preserve their security, but their way of life, and their very freedoms. Four freedoms, to be exact: freedom of speech, freedom from want, freedom of religion, and freedom from fear.

Roosevelt's words helped define American politics and foreign policy for generations, but the freedom he desired are not necessarily those espoused today. He called for freedom from want, citing the need for universal health care in particular. Needless to say, contemporary Americans continue to struggle to find a universal sense of how much is too much, and how much should government do to keep all its citizens from wanting. He called for freedom of speech, yet today we debate if that applies to corporations as well as people, and if money and speech are truly one and the same. He called for the freedom to worship as one pleases, yet as the recent campaign demonstrated, not every religion is universally embraced across the political spectrum. Finally, Roosevelt promised freedom from fear, and today Americans live as fearful of the future as ever. Contemporary Americans live in the shadow of FDR, but as we ponder the country’s future, and as we trace the evolution of our common understanding of this term from 1941 to our present day, we need ask as well: if we stand for freedom, can we even define it?

Jeffrey Engel / Southern Methodist University
Jeffrey A. Engel is founding director of the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University. He has taught at Yale University, the University of Pennsylvania, Haverford College, and taught history and public policy at Texas A&M University. He has authored or edited eight books on American foreign policy, and is currently writing "Seeking Monsters to Destroy: How America Goes to War, From Jefferson to Obama" and a comprehensive diplomatic history of the first Bush Administration entitled "When the World Seemed New: George H.Bush and the Surprisingly Peaceful End of the Cold War."

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
Race in America: Where are we now?

Christina Greer / Fordham University

In this lecture, Professor Greer will encourage participants to solidify and define their current understanding of race and ethnicity in relation to group identity in the U.S., incorporation of immigrants over time, and the overall political climate in America today. The class will dissect the interplay between race and ethnicity and look at how these dual identities affect participation and policy attitudes.

In addition, we'll discuss feelings toward the American Dream in 2017 and beyond. Specifically, we'll consider the promise of economic, political, and social advancement, regardless of race or other circumstances. In the Q & A portion of the presentation, we will talk about whether preservation of an ethnic identity is an essential element in better achieving representation, policy stances, and political participation as a pathway to success in our country now.

Christina Greer / Fordham University
Christina Greer is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University. Her book "Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream," was the recipient of the WEB du Bois Best Book Award. She was also voted City & State's 2014 Top 40 Under 40 Rising Stars. Professor Greer is a frequent political commentator on several media outlets, primarily MSNBC and NY1, and is often quoted in media outlets such as the NYTimes, Wall Street Journal, Newsday, and the AP.

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
Music as a Mirror of History: 300 Years in 60 Minutes

Robert Greenberg / UC Berkeley / SF Performances

This presentation examines Western music as an artistic phenomenon that mirrors the social, political, spiritual and economic realities of its time. As such, the ongoing changes in musical style evident in Western music during the last millennia are a function of large-scale societal change and are not due to any particular composer's "creative muse." Starting with the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and the intellectual and spiritual climate of the High Baroque (ca. 1720), this program will observe the changes wrought by Enlightenment society on the music of the Classical Era (ca. 1780) as manifested in the work of Wolfgang Gottlieb Mozart. This class will observe the impact of the Age of Revolution and Napoleon through a lens provided by the radical and experimental music of Ludwig van Beethoven (ca. 1810).

Other topics to be explored include the nature and conception of "the composer", Beethoven's gastro-intestinal problems (not pretty, but relevant), architecture and landscape design in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and the applicability of the concept of "music as a mirror" to American popular music of the 1950s and 1960s.

Robert Greenberg / UC Berkeley / SF Performances
Robert Greenberg has composed over fifty works for a wide variety of instrumental and vocal ensembles. He has received numerous honors, including being designated an official "Steinway Artist," three Nicola de Lorenzo Composition Prizes and three Meet-The-Composer Grants. Notable commissions have been received from the Koussevitzky Foundation in the Library of Congress, the Alexander String Quartet, the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players, San Francisco Performances, and the XTET ensemble. He has served on the faculties of the University of California at Berkeley, California State University East Bay, and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, where he chaired the Department of Music History and Literature and served as the Director of the Adult Extension Division. The Bangor Daily News referred to Greenberg as 'the Elvis of music appreciation.'"

afternoon session

2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
The Supreme Court: What's Next? (an up-to-the-minute presentation)

Alison Gash / University of Oregon

Few at the Founding could have ever imagined the Supreme Court becoming one of the most powerful policymaking institutions in the United States. Yet today, the Court has the power to sidestep public opinion, upend federal legislation, constrain state governance and even bring down the President. Professor Alison Gash will take us back to the Court's humble beginnings, charting how the Court amassed its power under Justice Marshall's leadership. Professor Gash will introduce us to the Court's struggles under pre-and post-Reconstruction racial apartheid, its skirmishes with legislative and executive power during the New Deal era, and its foray into areas of privacy, intimacy and expression.

As we walk through the Court's history, meandering through landmark decisions, Professor Gash will use her research on law and social policy to highlight the importance of understanding the Court not only as a legal actor but also as a significant source of policy innovation and paralysis. Through this lens, Professor Gash will demonstrate why the Court's makeup--its personalities and its relationships--can make or break American public policy.

Alison Gash / University of Oregon
Alison Gash is a political science professor at the University of Oregon, where she has received several fellowships and grants for her teaching. She specializes in US Supreme Court and civil rights laws. Professor Gash has also taught at Berkeley, where she received the Commendation for Excellence in Teaching two years in a row. She is the author of "Below the Radar: How Silence Can Save Civil Rights." Her work has appeared in Newsweek, Slate, Politico, and Washington Monthly.

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