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A Day of Health and Wellness with The Raleigh News and Observer

Saturday, March 14, 2020 9:30 am - 1:15 pm

schedule

9:30 am - 10:35 am
Why Some People Are Resilient, and Others Are Not

Andrew Shatte / University of Arizona

In this fast-paced, interactive, and fun session Dr. Andrew Shatté will lead you on a tour of the big questions in the psychology of resilience. Why does one person overcome adversity while another falls into helplessness? What are the 7 ingredients that make up resilience – and do you have them?

We will see that habits in how we think have an enormous impact on resilience. You will gain insight into two of your thinking styles and learn about the impact they can have on your success, happiness, and health. Dr. Shatté will show you how to boost resilience with case studies from his work in large corporations and the public sector. And in the final moments of the workshop, he'll even reveal the biggest secret to a life of resilience!

Andrew Shatte / University of Arizona

Andrew Shatté teaches psychology at the University of Arizona, and is also the founder and President of Mindflex, a training company that specializes in measuring and training for resilience. Professor Shatt&eacute first joined One Day University when he was a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was given the “Best Professor” award by the students in 2003 and received the Dean’s award for distinguished teaching in 2006. He co-wrote “The Resilience Factor,” and “Mequilibrium.”

10:50 am - 11:55 am
Creativity, Genius, and the Brain

Heather Berlin / Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

What does originality and invention look like in the brain? A full understanding of the creative process requires an exploration of unconscious processes, as well the intentional and deliberative effort that goes into creative work. A great deal of complex cognitive processing occurs at the unconscious level and affects how humans behave, think and feel. Scientists are now beginning to understand how this occurs at the neural level. In this class, Professor Berlin will present new research examining the neural basis of spontaneous creativity (i.e., improvisation), which illuminates aspects of the creative process that are governed by conscious vs. unconscious processes, and what an artists' brain can teach us about the creative "flow state."

She will also introduce research that explores our understanding of genius. What can we learn from Einstein's brain? Is there a relationship between madness and genius? Why are playfulness, creativity, and impulsivity greater during childhood than at other stages of development, and how does the brain make use of stimuli processed outside of awareness to create works of genius? By understanding how unconscious neural processes contribute to both our self-destructive habits and our highest mental faculties of creativity, we can ultimately learn to live more fulfilled lives, placing our instincts in service of our goals rather than vice versa.

Heather Berlin / Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Heather Berlin is a cognitive neuroscientist, Professor of Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Visiting Scholar at the New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute. She is a committee member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Science and Entertainment Exchange, and host of the PBS series “Science Goes to the Movies,” and the Discovery Channel series “Superhuman Showdown.”Professor Berlin has been the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including a Young Investigator Award from the American Neuropsychiatric Association, the International Neuropsychological Society Phillip M. Rennick Award, and the Clifford Yorke Prize from the International Neuropsychoanalysis Society.

12:10 pm - 1:15 pm
Understanding Memory: How it Works and How to Improve it

Thad Polk / University of Michigan

Human beings store away huge quantities of information in memory. We remember countless facts about the world (e.g., birds have wings, 2+2=4, there are 26 letters in the alphabet) as well specific information about our own lives (e.g., what we had for lunch, where we went for our last vacation, our first kiss). We remember how to tie our shoes, how to ride a bike, and how to write our signature. Most of the time we retrieve information from this enormous database of memory so efficiently and effectively that we don't even give it a second thought. But how does that work? How do we store information away into memory and then retrieve exactly the information we need minutes, days, or even years later? Conversely, why do we so often forget someone's name or where we put our keys? And perhaps most importantly, is there anything we can do to improve our memory and keep it sharp?

This course will address all those questions and many more. We'll dive into the psychological and neural mechanisms that underlie our amazing ability to remember. We'll discover that we're actually equipped with multiple different memory systems that are specialized for remembering different types of information. We'll learn about factors that can have a dramatic impact on memory, such as motivation, emotion, and aging. And we'll also discuss ways to maximize our memory by applying techniques that have been scientifically demonstrated to improve retention. After taking this course, you'll have a new appreciation for the extremely powerful memory mechanisms in your own brain and a better understanding of how to use them most effectively.

Thad Polk / University of Michigan

Thad Polk is an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Michigan. His research combines functional imaging of the human brain with computational modeling and behavioral methods to investigate the neural architecture underlying cognition. Professor Polk regularly collaborates with scientists at the University of Texas at Dallas and at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, where he is a frequent visiting scientist. His teaching at the University of Michigan has been recognized by numerous awards, and he was listed as one of The Princeton Review’s Best 300 Professors in the United States.

A Day of Health and Wellness with The Raleigh News and Observer

Tickets

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A Day of Health and Wellness (Raleigh) - 3/14/20
$ 159.00
322 available