CANCELLED: One Day University with The Dallas Morning News

Saturday, October 13, 2018 9:03 am - 1:15 pm

schedule

12:10 pm - 1:15 pm
Music as a Mirror of History: 300 Years in 60 Minutes

Robert Greenberg / San Francisco Conservatory of Music

This presentation examines Western music as an artistic phenomenon that mirrors the social, political, spiritual and economic realities of its time. As such, the ongoing changes in musical style evident in Western music during the last millennia are a function of large-scale societal change and are not due to any particular composer's "creative muse." Starting with the music of Johann Sebastian Bach and the intellectual and spiritual climate of the High Baroque (ca. 1720), this program will observe the changes wrought by Enlightenment society on the music of the Classical Era (ca. 1780) as manifested in the work of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. This class will observe the impact of the Age of Revolution and Napoleon through a lens provided by the radical and experimental music of Ludwig van Beethoven (ca. 1810).

Other topics to be explored include the nature and conception of "the composer", Beethoven's gastro-intestinal problems (not pretty, but relevant), architecture and landscape design in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and the applicability of the concept of "music as a mirror" to American popular music of the 1950s and 1960s.

Robert Greenberg / San Francisco Conservatory of Music

Robert Greenberg has composed over fifty works for a wide variety of instrumental and vocal ensembles. He has received numerous honors, including being designated an official “Steinway Artist,” three Nicola de Lorenzo Composition Prizes and three Meet-The-Composer Grants. Notable commissions have been received from the Koussevitzky Foundation in the Library of Congress, the Alexander String Quartet, the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players, San Francisco Performances, and the XTET ensemble. He has served on the faculties of the University of California at Berkeley, California State University East Bay, and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, where he chaired the Department of Music History and Literature and served as the Director of the Adult Extension Division. The Bangor Daily News referred to Greenberg as ‘the Elvis of music appreciation.'”

10:50 am - 11:55 am
Free Speech Revisited: Provocative Views of the First Amendment

Alison Gash / University of Oregon

Free speech is at the foundation of almost every political battle in the United States–and for good reason. It is the basis of our democracy. As Benjamin Franklin said, "Freedom of speech is a principal pillar of a free government: When this support is taken away, the constitution of a free society is dissolved." Yet, as critical as they may be to a functioning democracy, our rights to free speech are also among the most contested. From campuses to football fields, and whether to protest war, oppose elections, catalyze hate or highlight racial injustice, fights over the meaning and exercise of free speech dominate every critical political moment in American history.

This course provides an overview of the most important and contentious battles over free speech in order to highlight how deeply contested and significant free speech is in American politics. The course will look at historical and contemporary debates over free speech, examining how the founding fathers understood free speech at the time of the Constitutional convention, how courts have expanded and altered the scope and breadth of our free speech rights, and how politicians and activists have used free speech as a way of either constraining or promoting particular perspectives. The course will also explore conflicts between free speech and other Constitutional rights. Some of the most prominent free speech battles have been waged against the backdrop of white supremacy, policy brutality, and gay rights. Students will come to see how questions over the difference between free speech and hate speech–over expression or exclusion–are a major component of some of the most heated and salient civil rights struggles.

Alison Gash / University of Oregon

Alison Gash is a political science professor and a member of the Provost’s Teaching Academy at the University of Oregon, where she has received several fellowships and grants for her teaching. She was recently awarded the Martin Luther King Jr. Award. Professor Gash has also taught at Berkeley, where she received the Commendation for Excellence in Teaching two years in a row. She is the author of “Below the Radar: How Silence Can Save Civil Rights.” Her work has appeared in Newsweek, Slate, Politico, and Washington Monthly.

9:30 am - 10:35 am
How the 1960s Shaped American Politics Today

Leonard Steinhorn / American University

We may not wear bell bottoms and tie-dye t-shirts anymore, and let's not talk about what happened to our hair. But even though it's been half a century since the 1960s, it’s a decade that continues to reverberate in our society, politics, culture, and institutions to this very day. In so many ways it was the Sixties that spawned today's polarization and culture wars, which divide us now the way Vietnam did back then. From civil rights to feminism to gay liberation to the environmental movement to the silent majority, what started in the Sixties has shaped and influenced our country ever since. 

To many, the presidency of Barack Obama symbolized the liberation movements of the Sixties. But it's also important to ask how the Sixties produced the presidency of Donald Trump. It's the Sixties, its meaning and its legacy that may well be the dividing line in our politics today.

Leonard Steinhorn / American University

Leonard Steinhorn is a professor of communication and affiliate professor of history at American University. He currently serves as a political analyst for CBS News in Washington, D.C. He is the author of “The Greater Generation: In Defense of the Baby Boom Legacy,” and co-author of “By the Color of Our Skin: The Illusion of Integration and the Reality of Race,” books that have generated widespread discussion and debate. Professor Steinhorn’s writings have been featured in several publications, including The Washington Post, Salon, Politico, and Huffington Post. He has twice been named Faculty Member of the Year at AU.