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One Day University: 10 Professors with the Dallas Morning News

May 10, 2014 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM

 

One Day University and The Dallas Morning News have partnered to bring you a fascinating day of learning. Our adult "students-for-a-day" will choose the five presentations they want to attend from the list of classes and professors below.

 

Schedule of Classes and Professors
You Choose the 5 You Want

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Living and Dying in America: The Future of Healthcare

Michael Sparer / Columbia University

The nation's health care system is in the midst of an extraordinary transformation. Hospitals and insurance companies are merging (and the lines between the two are blurring). There are fewer and fewer solo practice physicians. Large retail chains (from CVS to Walmart) are entering the health care business. Government's role as a payer and regulator is growing, prompted by legislation such as the Affordable Care Act. There are fewer and fewer uninsured, but those who are insured are paying more and more of their health care bill (through higher premiums and deductibles).

In this lecture, Professor Michael Sparer reviews these trends, as well as several others that are sure to have a profound impact on where we get our medical care, what the quality of that care will be, and how we pay for it. The lecture also considers the politics of health care, both in the 2016 Presidential campaign and beyond. What are the key health care issues facing a new President, what are the key differences between the two political parties on these issues, and how will the resolution of these issues affect every one of us?

Michael Sparer / Columbia University
Michael Sparer is a professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University. Professor Sparer is also the Chair of Health Policy & Management. He is a two-time winner of the Mailman School's Student Government Association Teacher of the Year Award, as well as the recipient of a 2010 Columbia University Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching. He spent seven years as a litigator for the New York City Law Department.

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
China and Russia: The Rise of the Rest

Stephen Kotkin / Princeton University

Think back to the 1970s: the end of the Vietnam War, inflation, America's rust-belt factories going bust, disco, a stagnant Soviet Union under Leonid Brezhnev, intense global poverty in populous places like Communist China, where additionally Mao had imposed the bloodbath of the Cultural Revolution. Now look around today, 40 years later: the Soviet Union is long gone and Russia has a large middle class. China is the world's great economic dynamo. What happened? How should we understand these changes? How might things look another 40 years hence? Does the apparent "rise of the rest" portend a decline in American power and influence? Is America's place in the world, in fact, changing? Should it change? Or, is the "rise of the rest" just a temporary phenomenon, overhyped, a marketing slogan? Might China instead crash? Is Russia set for reversals, too? What are the real strengths and weaknesses of China and Russia? More broadly, what lessons can we draw from these cases about global geopolitics and the world in which our children and grandchildren might live?

Stephen Kotkin / Princeton University
Stephen Kotkin is the John P. Birkelund Professor in History and International Affairs at Princeton. Professor Kotkin established the department's Global History workshop. He serves on the core editorial committee of the journal, World Politics. He founded and edits a book series on Northeast Asia. From 2003 until 2007, he was a member and then chair of the editorial board at Princeton University Press, and is a regular book reviewer for the New York Times Sunday Business section.

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM
The Global Economy: Where Are We Headed?

Paul Bracken / Yale University School of Management

It probably comes as little shock to anyone to state that the global economy is far from healthy. Between the European Union’s unemployment problem, global worries over “competitive devaluation,” debt monetization, and uneasy political alliances, economic analysts the world over will tell you the same thing. This raises a basic question. How do we analyze the global economy, as its "chunks" (Europe, China, US, Japan, the BRICs) and heads in a variety of different political and economic directions? This talk will organize the big picture and answer the question. Paul Bracken developed and teaches the Yale Problem Framing course required of all first year MBA students, and also teaches in Yale College.

Paul Bracken / Yale University School of Management
Paul Bracken is a leading expert in global competition and the strategic application of technology in business and defense. Professor Bracken is consistently rated as one of the top executive education teachers in the world, bringing together practical as well as academic perspectives. He is a consultant to private equity funds, accounting, and insurance companies as well as several arms of the U.S. Government. A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, he is included in Princeton Review's book, "The Best 300 Professors in America." He has served on the Chief of Naval Operations Executive Panel, and has co-chaired the Board of Advisors of the U.S. Naval War College and the Naval Postgraduate School.

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM
The Civil War and Abraham Lincoln: What's Fact and What's Fiction?

Louis Masur / Rutgers University

Abraham Lincoln is considered our greatest President and one of the most controversial. People have debated various aspects of his personality and politics. Was he depressed? Why did he tell so many stories? Was he truly opposed to slavery? Did he free the slaves? Did the Union prevail because of his leadership or despite him? This class aims to uncover the man and not the myth. In 1922, the historian W.E.B. DuBois proclaimed that Lincoln was “big enough to be inconsistent.” To be sure, there were tensions in Lincoln’s character and ideology: he could be happy and melancholy, could promote democracy and suspend civil liberties, could oppose slavery yet have doubts about the place of blacks in American society.

Some of what DuBois saw as inconsistency had more to do with political reality, especially in regard to the issue of the abolition of slavery. Lincoln had to contend with various pressures knowing that any misstep could very well lead to the destruction of the Union. Here is where his temperament becomes so important. As we shall see, Lincoln’s storytelling had a purpose, as did his gradual approach to decision making. But once he made up his mind, he seldom looked back. In the end, it is not that he was inconsistent, but that he was thoughtful and deliberate and was not afraid to change his mind and grow in the process.

Louis Masur / Rutgers University
Louis Masur is a Distinguished Professor of American Studies and History at Rutgers University. He received outstanding teaching awards from Rutgers, Trinity College, and the City College of New York, and won the Clive Prize for Excellence in Teaching from Harvard University. He is the author of many books including "Lincoln's Last Speech," which was inspired by a talk he presented at One Day University. His essays and articles have appeared in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Dallas Morning News, and Chicago Tribune. He is an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society and serves on the Historians' Council of the Gettysburg Foundation.

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
What Darwin Got Right, What Darwin Got Wrong

Susan Lindee / University of Pennsylvania

Charles Darwin's Origin of Species presented one of the most important ideas in the history of human thought. Darwin's impact over the last 150 years cannot be overstated: his ideas have provided the central organizing core for modern evolutionary science. But DNA had not been discovered, and therefore Darwin could not have foreseen the complexities of modern genetics. He did not understand that certain situations that occur in nature could confer advantages upon organisms that worked as a group instead of as selfish individuals. This fascinating class will bring us up to date on Darwin's remarkable theory which has survived a century and a half of rigorous scientific skepticism and scrutiny.

Susan Lindee / University of Pennsylvania
Susan Lindee is a Janice and Julian Bers Professor of History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania. She is also the Associate Dean for the School of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Lindee has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Burroughs Wellcome Fund 40th Anniversary Award, as well as support from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Wenner-Gren Foundation.

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
The Psychology of Money

Jeffrey Hancock / Stanford University

A wealthy man is one who earns $100 a year more than his wife's sister's husband. It turns out that H.L. Mencken's "definition" is more true than we might imagine, and it has implications for how we should think about money, wealth and even what kind of country we want to live in.

In this class we'll dig into some of the most pressing issues in the U.S. today: wealth, inequality, and what the psychology of money has to say about it. We'll start by asking whether there actually is wealth inequality in America, with the answer coming from you, the audience! We'll then discover whether it matters if there is inequality, and if it does, why? Lastly, we'll look at some of the key psychological factors that lead us to feel wealthy, or not.

Jeffrey Hancock / Stanford University
Jeffrey Hancock is a Professor of Communications at Stanford University. He was the Chair of the Information Science Department, and the co-Director of Cognitive Science at Cornell University. He is interested in social interactions mediated by information and communication technology, with an emphasis on how people produce and understand language in these contexts. His TED Talk on deception has been seen over 1 million times and he has been featured as a guest on "CBS This Morning" for his expertise on social media.

2:15 PM - 3:15 PM

Joseph Luzzi / Bard College

Joseph Luzzi / Bard College
Joseph Luzzi is a Literature and Italian Professor at Bard College, and was previously a Visiting Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he received the Scaglione Prize for his teaching. He is also the author of the audio course, "The Art of Reading." Professor Luzzi previously taught at Yale University, where he was awarded a Yale College Teaching Prize.

2:15 PM - 3:15 PM
What We Know About the Universe (and What We Don't Know)

David Helfand / Columbia University

Astronomy is unlike other sciences in that there are no experiments we can perform or expeditions we can mount to manipulate the objects of our study. We are reduced to passively observing the light the Universe sends us, some of which has traveled billions of years before falling on our telescopes. Because the light takes so long to get to us, we are always seeing the past. Far from being a disadvantage, however, this allows us to read history directly by looking out to objects at different distances. 

We can watch stars being born, living out their lives, and then dying in spectacular explosions that produce the elements from which we are made. We can watch how galaxies form and grow by gobbling up their neighbors. And we can map the nearest million galaxies and trace them back to the tiny fluctuations in the early Universe from which they emerged. Replete with colliding galaxies and a fly-through of the Universe set to the Blue Danube waltz, this lecture provides one-stop shopping for a comprehensive tour of all of space and time -- or at least of the whole 4% we actually understand.

David Helfand / Columbia University
David Helfand is a Professor of Astronomy at Columbia University where he served as chair of the Department and co-Director of the Astrophysics Laboratory for 15 years. He is President Emeritus of the American Astronomical Society and of Quest University Canada. He has received the Columbia Presidential Teaching Award and the Great Teacher Award from the Society of Columbia Graduates. He is also the author of the new book, "A Survival Guide to the Misinformation Age."

3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Four Films That Changed America

Marc Lapadula / Yale University

While most works of cinema are produced for mass-entertainment and escapism, a peculiar minority have had a profound influence on our culture. Whether intentionally or not, some movies have brought social issues to light, changed laws, forwarded ideologies both good and bad, and altered the course of American history through their resounding impact on society. Renowned Yale Film Professor Marc Lapadula will discuss four films that, for better or worse, made their mark.

The Jazz Singer
I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang
The Graduate
Easy Rider

Marc Lapadula / Yale University
Marc Lapadula is a Senior Lecturer in the Film Studies Program at Yale University. He is a playwright, screenwriter and an award-winning film producer. In addition to Yale, Professor Lapadula has taught at Columbia University's Graduate Film School, created the screenwriting programs at both The University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins where he won Outstanding Teaching awards and has lectured on film, playwriting and conducted highly-acclaimed screenwriting seminars all across the country at notable venues like The National Press Club, The Smithsonian Institution, and The New York Historical Society. He has also been an expert script analyst in major Hollywood lawsuits.

3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
How to Listen to and Appreciate Great Music

Michael Alec Rose / Vanderbilt University

What makes great music great? The answers to this question are as diverse as the repertoire of masterworks itself. Every great composer reinvents himself or herself countless times, coming up with new solutions to a vast range of expressive problems.

The common thread for all such greatness is the idea that there is a problem worth solving. How do you keep a brilliant insomniac occupied through all the hours of his sleeplessness? How can you combine the most refined classical grace with the most willful mischief? How can you make something wonderful out of nothing very promising? That’s a question for life itself, answered again and again, by every musical spirit from Handel, Beethoven, and Brahms to Duke Ellington, the Beatles, and Joni Mitchell. Join Professor Rose on this grand tour of breathtaking musical moments.

Michael Alec Rose / Vanderbilt University
Michael Alec Rose is Associate Professor of Composition at Vanderbilt University's Blair School of Music. His many awards and commissions include the Walter W. Naumburg Foundation's chamber music commission, 27 consecutive annual awards in composition from ASCAP, and three works for the Nashville Symphony. He co-directs an ongoing International Exchange Program between the Royal Academy of Music, London (RAM) and the Blair School. Professor Rose has won several major teaching awards at Vanderbilt, including the prestigious Chair of Teaching Excellence.

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