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One Day University - NYC - April 6 Featuring 11 Professors

April 06, 2014 9:30 AM – 4:15 PM

One Day University brings together professors from the finest schools in the country to present special versions of their very best lectures - LIVE. The professors listed below have won dozens of teaching awards and earned the highest possible ratings from their students. Now it’s your turn to choose which engaging subjects you would like to learn more about, and participate in a community of like-minded people who know that education does not end when you are handed a diploma.


Who Teaches at One Day University? Every school has a few professors that are wildly popular. We work closely with them to sift through many hours of material from full semester courses and identify the most fascinating topics. At One Day University there are no grades, no tests, no homework — and certainly no stress! Our events are designed to educate and to entertain.

 

Schedule of Classes and Professors
You Choose the 5 You Want

 

9:30am - 10:30am

Why Art Matters Now 
Tina Rivers / Columbia University

What's So Great About Frank Sinatra? How One Man's Voice and Style Defined America 
Anna Celenza / Georgetown University

Is the American Dream Still Alive? 
Wendy Schiller / Brown University

10:45am - 11:45am

Why Art Matters Now 
Tina Rivers / Columbia University

Is the American Dream Still Alive? 
Wendy Schiller / Brown University

Albert Einstein: Analyzing Genius
Douglas Stone / Yale University

Noon - 1:00pm

What's So Great About Frank Sinatra? How One Man's Voice and Style Defined America 
Anna Celenza / Georgetown University

The Great Recession - Will It Happen Again? When Bad Things Happen to Good Economies
Michael Klein / Tufts University

How Americans Think About Punishment, Revenge, Anger and Forgiveness 
Austin Sarat / Amherst College

Lunch Available for Purchase - 1:00pm - 2:00pm

 

2:00pm - 3:00pm

What's So Great About Isaac Newton? How a 17th Century Mathematician Has Shaped Our Lives
Joseph Yukich / Lehigh University

The Paradox of Choice: When More is Less 
Barry Schwartz / Swarthmore College

Marathon: The Battle That Changed the World 2500 Years Ago 
Richard Billows / Columbia University 

3:15pm - 4:15pm

The Science of Friendship and Marriage 
Harry Reis / University of Rochester

Machiavelli and The Laws of Power: How One Book Changed the World 500 Years Ago 
Christopher Celenza / Johns Hopkins

The Paradox of Choice: When More is Less 
Barry Schwartz / Swarthmore College

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


The Great Recession - Will It Happen Again?  When Bad Things Happen to Good Economies 

Michael Klein / Tufts University


Someday your grandchildren may ask you “Do you remember the Lehman weekend, and the Great Recession?”, just as you may have asked your grandparents about Black Friday and the Great Depression. In September 2008, the financial system came very close to total collapse, and the subsequent Great Recession has been the worst economic downturn in the post-war period. In this session, we will discuss the most significant economic event since the 1930s. 

 

Was the United States, before 2008, really a “good economy,” or did its relative robustness mask deep problems? What were the seeds of the Great Recession, and when were they sown? How were its causes similar to the sources of the Great Depression? Why was this recession so much worse than other post-World War II downturns? And, despite how bad things got, how did unprecedented policies based on lessons drawn from the Great Depression avoid the deep, prolonged economic distress of the 1930s? Finally, as engaged citizens, what can we learn from the past few years about issues that are likely to be the sources of debate about the economy for years to come.

 

The Paradox of Choice: When More is Less

Barry Schwartz / Swarthmore College


It seems only logical that the more choice people have, the better off they are. People who don't care can ignore most options. And people who do care will be able to find just what they want. But however true this is logically, /psycho/logically it is false. Too much choice can paralyze people, lead them to make bad decisions and make them dissatisfied with even good decisions. This is especially true for people who are out to get the "best." Our task is to find ways to limit options so that people derive the benefits of choice without suffering the psychological costs.


The Science of Friendship and Marriage

Harry Reis / University of Rochester


Friends, neighbors, lovers, teammates, spouses, life partners, co-workers, family. As the playwright Tony Kushner, paraphrasing Marx, wrote, “The smallest indivisible human unit is two people, not one; one is a fiction.” Our relationships are central to all human activity, and they are among the most important determinants of human health and well-being. Yet it is only recently that scientific research on relationships has coalesced into a comprehensive understanding of the factors that make relationships work and not work.

 

In this course we will review current knowledge about relationships, relying on evidence from the newly emerging field of relationship science. We will begin by discussing research that investigates the impact of relationships on emotional well-being, happiness, health, and mortality. We will then consider key questions about the development and maintenance of relationships. What leads us to initiate relationships with some people and not others? How do relationships evolve from initial contact to established connection? What makes long-term relationships, especially marriage and similar intimate ties, satisfying or dysfunctional? Throughout this session, we will examine the principles that relationship scientists use to understand this most important of human endeavors - our bonds with other people.


Marathon: The Battle That Changed the World 2500 Years Ago

Richard Billows / Columbia University


The Battle of Marathon is famous, but why is it important? Can one battle really change the course of a civilization? That's the argument Prof. Richard Billows has made in his book on this battle, and this course will explain why.

 

Classical Athens was shaped by fighting and winning at Marathon, and the Classical Athenians in turn shaped western culture. Are you interested in drama? The Athenians pioneered it. In philosophy? It was developed at Athens. In history? The first histories were written at and about Classical Athens. In democracy? The Athenians invented democracy. In money and banking? The Athenians developed the first international currency and the first commercial banks. How does all of this relate to the Battle of Marathon? Come to this course and find out.


Machiavelli and The Laws of Power: How One Book Changed the World 500 Years Ago

Christopher Celenza / Johns Hopkins


Just over five hundred years ago in Florence, in early 1513, Niccolò Machiavelli was arrested, imprisoned, and tortured, under suspicion (falsely, most probably) of involvement in an anti-government conspiracy. He was released in the spring of that year and placed under house arrest, which he carried out at a family property south of Florence. During that time, he reflected on his own substantial experience as a traveling Florentine diplomat and, as importantly, on ancient Roman history. From that reflection emerged The Prince, the Italian Renaissance’s most famous book, which this lecture will showcase. Machiavelli wrote in a particular way: episodically, with short chapters that were suitable for conversations and letters, and indeed often had their origins in these less formal formats.  In addition to bringing this aspect into relief, this lecture will focus on Machiavelli’s views on place of religion in politics, his considerations on the wielding of political power, both militarily and symbolically, and his haunting sense that instability and conflict were ever-present.


How Americans Think About Punishment, Revenge, Anger and Forgiveness

Austin Sarat / Amherst College


Justice is a deeply perplexing idea. Everyone seems to have their own idea about what justice requires. In this lecture we explore one of those ideas, namely that justice means giving people what they deserve, and examine the that idea informs American practices of punishment. We will ask, “What is the relationship of desert and punishment, and how we can we decide whether a punishment is just and proportional?” Examples will include the biblical story of Job and the history of punishment in the United States as well as the contemporary debate about America’s use of capital punishment. We will consider whether it is the commitment to just deserts as the measure of justice in punishment that is plays such an important role in a new national conversation about the death penalty.


Is the American Dream Still Alive?

Wendy Schiller / Brown University


The America of 2014 reflects significant changes in the underlying fabric of our society, with changes in the composition of our population, our social and religious attitudes, and economic structure.  In the last 100 years we have seen period of great social and political change, from the women’s suffrage movement to the labor movement to civil rights.  We are in the midst of another period of political and social transition. In assessing the future of American society, we have to once again push the reset button on defining equality and how we achieve it in both the private and public spheres of life.   This class will take on the hard questions, starting with the debate about equality of opportunity versus equality of outcomes.  How much can we guarantee equality of opportunity in political, educational, and economic life?  Can we guarantee equality of outcomes, and if so, under which circumstances?  And if we cannot guarantee equality, what does America stand for?


What's So Great About Isaac Newton? How a 17th Century Mathematician Has Shaped Our Lives   

Joseph Yukich / Lehigh University


The great mathematician Isaac Newton died almost 300 years ago. Who could have imagined the profound impact that his mathematics would have on our lives today? Who could have predicted that his mathematics would lie at the foundation of the modern world and that Newton commanded the future from his study more than Napoleon from his throne?

 

Newton, like the great scientists Gauss and Einstein, would be astonished that the mathematics which they bequeathed to the world would come to occupy a dominant and sometimes secret place in our banks, laptops, IPhones, hospital emergency rooms, and even in our corner supermarket. The mathematics of Newton, Gauss and Einstein is nowhere yet everywhere, hidden from view yet omnipresent, shaping our culture in unexpected and surprising ways. It has become unreasonably effective in ways that surprise even the experts.

 

The revolutionary concepts underlying the mathematization of today's world are as simple as they are profound. We focus on the most important of these concepts, exploring them in layman's terms. They are central to the fascinating story of how our world, from Hollywood to the Internet, has come to be shaped by the invisible hand of Isaac Newton and his mathematical progeny.


What's So Great About Frank Sinatra? How One Man's Voice and Style Defined America

Anna Celenza / Georgetown University


Frank Sinatra gave 20th-century America a voice. Through his music, stage shows, films and abashedly public private life, he offered audiences a vision of the "American Dream" that contrasted greatly with the suburban ideal of the hardworking man.

  

Sinatra was a genius -- in tune with his audiences needed and desired. But this isn't what made him great. As this lecture demonstrates, Sinatra's name lives on because of his distinctive musical style. His phrasing and tone, the timbre of his voice: these are the qualities that set him apart. Using numerous musical examples, Anna Celenza traces the origins of the famous "Sinatra Sound" and reveals how, over the last half century, it has influenced a disparate array of musical styles and genres that make up the kaleidoscopic nature of today's American soundtrack. Sinatra is great, because his music is still with us. His "voice" now joined with others seeking to find their own way.

 

Why Art Matters Now  

Tina Rivers / Columbia University


No matter how you look at it, the art world has never been hotter: auction records are continually broken, art fairs are proliferating around the globe, and people will wait hours in line at museums for blockbuster shows. It’s a simple fact that more people are seeing more art in more places than ever before. But it seems like the more we look, the less we’re seeing: more and more, we give art the same impoverished attention we give shopping or sightseeing, and for many people, art is nothing more than a sound financial investment or a cool image to post on the internet. If we’re willing to put in the effort, however, art still has a lot to offer us, and matters as much as it ever did. In the past, art showed us beauty, taught us morals, recorded history, or inspired religious feeling; today, art asks us to think about ourselves and our relationship to the world around us, and teaches us a form of critical thinking opposed to the hectic pace of our everyday lives. Looking closely at a few works of art from the last fifty years, we will see why art matters now, and why we need to learn how to see it.


Albert Einstein: Analyzing Genius

Douglas Stone / Yale University

  

The name Einstein, and the image of the white-maned sage with a twinkle in his eyes, has become synonymous with genius. But what did he actually do as a young man to transcend all other scientists of the twentieth century? Is it possible that his impact has been exaggerated?

 

The answer is a resounding negative. There were two revolutions in physical science at the beginning of the 20th century. The first, associated with Einstein’s Theory of Relativity and the famous equation E = mc2, changed our understanding of the flow of time and the geometry of space. The second, known as quantum physics, unlocked the secrets of the atom and led directly to most of the world-changing technologies of the 20th and 21st centuries. Einstein role in this latter breakthrough is less well appreciated but was no less central. This lecture will elucidate the remarkable insights that this one man produced that changed our understanding of nature and the cosmos, as well as sketching a portrait of the charisma and integrity of this historic seeker of truth.

  

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