New Classes. New Cities. Discounts and More!

One Day University in Minneapolis with 8 Professors

April 26, 2014 9:30 PM – 4:00 PM

 

 

One Day University:
A Fascinating Day of Learning.

Our adult "students-for-a-day" each choose four presentations
from the list of 8 classes and professors below

 

STAR TRIBUNE READERS PAY $159 - USE CODE STAR159

 

 

SCHEDULE and PROFESSORS

 

Each Class is 75 Minutes • You Choose the 4 You Want

 
9:30am - 10:45am

National Security vs. Freedom of Expression 

Stephen Whitfield / Brandeis University

Brandeis Student Union Teaching Award

OR

Abraham Lincoln: What's Fact and What's Fiction

Louis Masur / Rutgers University

Historians' Council of the Gettysburg Foundation

 
11:00am - 12:15pm

Why Politicians Think The Way They Do 

William Burke-White / University of Pennsylvania

A. Leo Levin Award for Teaching Excellence

OR

Morality in America: From The Pilgrims to Today

James Morone / Brown University 

Hazeltine Citation for Outstanding Teacher

 
12:15pm - 1:15pm Lunch
 
1:15pm - 2:30pm

Four Books Every Book Lover Should Read

Joseph Luzzi / Bard College

Recipient of Yale College Teaching Prize

OR

The Middle East and the Arab Spring 

Jean Oppenheim / Columbia University 

Fulbright Award Winner / Columbia Presidential Fellowship

 
2:45pm - 4:00pm

Behavioral Economics: When Rational People Make Irrational Decisions 

Tim Taylor / Macalester College

Voted Teacher of the Year by the Master's Degree Students 

OR

Beethoven and The Beatles: Hearing the Connections

Michael Alec Rose / Vanderbilt University 

Recipient of Chair of Teaching Excellence

 
 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

National Security vs. Freedom of Expression 

Stephen Whitfield / Brandeis University 

 

This timely class will focus on how the necessity to ensure national security must be reconciled with the rights guaranteed in the First Amendment - a democratic dilemma that continues to demand public attention. In 1971 that challenge reached a flashpoint when the press leaked the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret account of the origins of the Vietnam War - while it was still raging. No Constitutional case in American history became more urgent or more important in testing how free the media were (or are) in revealing to the citizenry what the U. S. government intended, while pursuing a war, to keep secret. Four decades later the political and legal issues that the episode exposed deserve to be pondered and evaluated again. Recent leaks by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden have provided new insight into how the government monitors domestic and foreign communications for threats to national security.

 

Why Politicians Think The Way They Do 

William Burke-White / University of Pennsylvania 

 

Why do America’s foreign policy leaders view the world the way they do? Why did George Washington urge the United States to “steer clear of permanent alliances”? Why did George Bush believe that democracy could be imposed in the Middle East? And why does Barack Obama perceive an “arch of history” motivating the Arab Spring? How have our leaders - past and present - understood the world around them and how have those understandings shaped American foreign policy through the years?

 

This lecture explores the basic theories of international relations and considers how theoretical frameworks-including realism,  institutionalism, constructivism, and liberalism-have shaped the world-view of America’s leaders. We will consider the particular policy choices of America’s Presidents and Secretaries of State from George Washington and George Bush to Henry Kissinger and Hillary Clinton. Particular examples, such as the different approaches toward the Middle East of George Bush and Barack Obama, will highlight the importance of the theoretical frames and world-views foreign policy leaders bring with them to the Oval Office.

 

Abraham Lincoln: What's Fact and What's Fiction 

Louis Masur / Rutgers University 

 

Abraham Lincoln is considered our greatest President and one of the most controversial. People have debated various aspects of his personality and politics. Was he depressed? Why did he tell so many stories? Was he truly opposed to slavery? Did he free the slaves? Did the Union prevail because of his leadership or despite him? This class aims to uncover the man and not the myth. In 1922, the historian W.E.B. DuBois proclaimed that Lincoln was “big enough to be inconsistent.” To be sure, there were tensions in Lincoln’s character and ideology: he could be happy and melancholy, could promote democracy and suspend civil liberties, could oppose slavery yet have doubts about the place of blacks in American society. Some of what DuBois saw as inconsistency had more to do with political reality, especially in regard to the issue of the abolition of slavery. Lincoln had to contend with various pressures knowing that any misstep could very well lead to the destruction of the Union.

 

Here is where his temperament becomes so important. As we shall see, Lincoln’s storytelling had a purpose, as did his gradual approach to decision making. But once he made up his mind, he seldom looked back. In the end, it is not that he was inconsistent, but that he was thoughtful and deliberate and was not afraid to change his mind and grow in the process.

 

Morality in America: From the Pilgrims to Today 

James Morone / Brown University 

 

While running for President in 2012, Rick Santorum noted that Satan has his sights on the United States of America. Mitt Romney attacked the decay caused by Barack Obama’s “secular agenda” and Newt Gingrich stated, “A country that has been now since 1963 relentlessly in the courts driving God out of public life shouldn’t be surprised at all the problems we have.”

 

How did the USA become a nation with the soul of a church? Moral fervor led Americans to hang witches, enslave Africans, ban liquor, and lock up more people than any other nation. It also inspired abolition, feminism, and civil rights. And all the while politicians misbehaved (one out of three presidents had affairs) and robber barons plundered. Come learn the moral history of America: Featuring Puritans, witches, white slaves, Prohibition, the social gospel, Martin Luther King, feminism, wolves on Wall Street, sexting and more. In this unique and remarkable class,  Brown Political Science Professor James Morone recasts American history as a moral epic -- influencing everything from abortion to impeachment, from education to foreign policy.

 

Four Books Every Book Reader Should Read 

Joseph Luzzi / Bard College

 

What books are a must for every lover of literature? Award-winning scholar and teacher, Professor Joseph Luzzi will explore this question with participants in an intimate seminar devoted to exploring the riches of literary expression. We will discuss such world-renowned classics as  Shakespeare's Othello (1604), and also cover more recent works including F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby (1925), Joseph Heller's Catch-22 (1961), and Philip Roth's American Pastoral (1997).



This seminar will demonstrate how these fascinating works help us understand some of the most pressing concerns today, including the nature of religious faith, questions of personal identity, even the quest for the American Dream. Participants will be encouraged to develop their own list of “essential reading,” as Professor Luzzi helps them acquire the skills necessary for enriching their encounters with books of all kinds.
 

 

The Middle East and The Arab Spring 

Jean Oppenheim / Columbia University

 

The current revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa are only the latest manifestations of explosive changes that have raked the region since the end of the 19th Century. However, this time the issues and their origins, the actors, and the stakes are quite different. Facing daunting socio-economic challenges, irreconcilable sectarian differences, and historically rooted ideological aspirations, Muslim societies from the Atlantic to the Gulf are likely to be in the throes of revolution for at least a generation.

 

While all states of the region are important, some are far more important than others. Egypt, Syria, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and Israel are key players whose dynamics and policies have consequences for all. Additionally, such non-state actors as Hezbollah, Al-Qaeda, and others also affect outcomes. Lastly, we need to raise questions that do not always have answers. For example, are Islam and democracy compatible? Should the US actively engage in the on-going changes or should it allow for a natural and organic process to occur thereby letting the cards fall where they might?

 

Behavioral Economics: When Rational People Make Irrational Decisions 

Timothy Taylor / Macalister College

 

Economics often describes a world in which consumers, workers, savers, and business managers thoughtfully and rationally pursue their own self-interest. But a wide array of work in psychology and economics shows that people often act irrationally. They have self-control problems, and act in ways they will regret in the future. They worry more losses than gains. They act with myopic disregard for the long run. They overrate the likelihood that low-probability events will occur. Their choices are heavily affected by how a the options are phrased; in  particular, they more often go with whatever is presented as the default option. They chase trends.

 

Behavioral economics, which has become a hot area of study for economists in the last two decades, considers how these biases and irrationalities affect economic decision-making. What sort of biased or less-than-rational actions are people likely to make? How might firms try to profit from consumers or workers who act in these ways? Will market competition limit the extent to which firms can take advantage of consumers? Should government implement nudge” policies, in which information is presented or a decision is framed in a way so as to encourage people away from less-than-rational behavior? This talk will explain behavioral economics and discuss how it applies to retirement saving, dieting, appliance warranties, energy conservation, and a number of other topics. 

 

Beethoven and The Beatles: Hearing the Connections

Michael Alec Rose / Vanderbilt University 

   

What do the finale of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony and the Beatles song “Hey Jude” have in common? For one thing, the scope of each work is unprecedented: a vast movement for orchestral and vocal forces and a seven-minute song were both radical departures for symphonic music and rock ‘n’ roll. Above all, it’s the spiritual message shared by these pieces that binds them together across historical time and stylistic distance. Professor Rose will help you hear these connections between them, along with a powerful link to a sonnet by Shakespeare.

 

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Sorry this event is sold out.

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