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One Day University: 8 Professors with the Dallas Morning News

September 20, 2014 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM

 

One Day University and The Dallas Morning News have partnered to bring you a fascinating day of learning.

 

You can choose the 4 classes you want to take the day of the event!

 

The classes will be divided between the Winspear Opera House and the Dallas City Performance Hall. Please reference your program upon arrival for specific class locations.

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
National Security vs. Freedom of Expression: The Real Inside Story of The Pentagon Papers

Stephen Whitfield / Brandeis University

Published by The New York Times in 1971, The Pentagon Papers divided an already deeply fractured nation with startling and disturbing revelations about the United States' involvement in Vietnam. The Washington Post called them "the most significant leaks of classified material in American history" and they remain relevant today as a reminder of the importance of a free press. Indeed, they are a focal point of The Post, a new film by Steven Spielberg about that era.

This timely class will focus on how the necessity to ensure national security must be reconciled with the rights guaranteed in the First Amendment - a democratic dilemma that continues to demand public attention. That challenge certainly reached a flashpoint when the press leaked the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret account of the origins of the Vietnam War - while it was still raging.

No constitutional case in American history became more urgent or more important in testing how free the media were (or are) in revealing to the citizenry what the U.S. government intended, while pursuing a war, to keep secret. Nearly five decades later, the political and legal issues that the episode exposed deserve to be pondered and evaluated again.

Stephen Whitfield / Brandeis University
Stephen Whitfield is an American Studies professor at Brandeis University. Has has won several teaching awards including the Samuel Proctor Award for Distinguished Scholarship, the Brandeis Student Union Teaching Award, and the Louis Dembitz Brandeis Prize for Excellence in Teaching.

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Men, Women, And Politics (A World Of Difference)

Jennifer Lawless / American University

Study after study finds that when women run for office, they perform as well as men, both in terms of the amount of money they raise and the votes they receive. Yet women remain severely under-represented in U.S. politics. When Congress convened in January 2013, 81% of its members were men. Men occupy the governor's mansion in 45 of the 50 states, and they run City Hall in 88 of the 100 largest cities across the country.

In this lecture, Jennifer Lawless explains why this is the case. Based on multiple national surveys she conducted of more than 10,000 "eligible candidates" in 2001, 2008, and 2010, she finds that women, even in the highest tiers of professional accomplishment, are substantially less likely than men to demonstrate ambition to seek elective office. Women are less likely than men to be recruited to run for office, and they are less likely than men to think they are qualified to run for office. Despite cultural evolution and society's changing attitudes toward women in politics, running for public office remains a much less attractive and feasible endeavor for women than for men. In addition, research shows that men and women often differ substatially in their attitudes towards candidates at ever political level, and Professor Lawless will discuss these findings as well.

Jennifer Lawless / American University
Jennifer Lawless is a nationally recognized expert on women's involvement in politics. She is the author of "Becoming a Candidate: Political Ambition and the Decision to Run for Office" and the co-author of the book, "It Still Takes a Candidate: Why Women Don't Run for Office". She has also issued several policy reports on the barriers that impede women's candidate emergence.

11:05 AM - 12:20 PM
Is the American Dream still alive - in Texas and the rest of the nation?

Wendy Schiller / Brown University

The America of 2017 reflects significant changes in the underlying fabric of our society, with changes in the composition of our population, our attitudes and our national social structure. In the last 100 years we have seen period of great social and political change, from the women's suffrage movement to the labor movement to civil rights. We are in the midst of another period of political and social transition. This class will take on the difficult question: What does America stand for?

Wendy Schiller / Brown University
Wendy Schiller is the Chair of the Political Science Department at Brown University. She is an expert in the field of the U.S. Congress and political representation, and the recent recipient of a National Science Foundation grant to study party conflict and factionalism in the U.S. Senate. Professor Schiller has been a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution and a six-time recipient of the Undergraduate Teaching and Research Award at Brown.

11:05 AM - 12:20 PM

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1:40 PM - 2:55 PM
When Intuition Fails: Why We're Often Wrong When We Think We're Right

Christopher Chabris / Union College / Geisinger

Modern life is complex, and to navigate this complexity and make reasonable decisions, we tend to rely on intuition. For most decisions, we just "know" what the right choice is, usually without even thinking about it. But psychological research has shown repeatedly that we miss a lot of crucial information - information that would make a big difference if we had it and knew how to use it. This seminar will review the ways our intuitions deceive us, focusing on how we trust our perception, memory, and confidence much more than we should. It will then discuss about ways we can overcome these faults and see what we are missing.

The talk will weave familiar news stories (Donald Trump, Anthony Weiner, Bernie Madoff) with less familiar characters (Boston police officer Kenny Conley, the Driscoll Middle School football team) and entertaining research studies by Professor Chabris and other cognitive and social psychologists. Students will leave with a better appreciation of how and why we miss so much that is important, and some ways to think about what they are missing in their own decision-making processes.

Christopher Chabris / Union College / Geisinger
Christopher Chabris is a Professor at Geisinger, an integrated healthcare system in Pennsylvania, and a Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse, France. He was a professor at Union College for ten years, during which time he was shortlisted for the college-wide Stillman Prize for Excellence in Teaching, and also gave the Distinguished Lecture at the Association for Psychological Science Teaching Institute. His research focuses on attention, intelligence (individual, collective, and social), behavior genetics, and decision-making. His work has been published in leading journals including Science, Nature, PNAS, Psychological Science, Perception, and Cognitive Science. Professor Chabris is also co-author of the bestselling book "The Invisible Gorilla: How Our Intuitions Deceive Us," published in 20 languages.

1:40 PM - 2:55 PM
The Five Most Powerful People in the World

William Burke-White / University of Pennsylvania

Who are the real influencers on the world stage? Who makes the decisions that determine war and peace? Economic growth or stagnation? Global cooperation or political stagnation? 

This lecture answers those questions by examining how we think about power and influence in international politics. We will consider traditional answers based on military might and examine how globalization, technology, ideology, and economic interdependence are changing the ways we should think about power and influence.

After engaging in an analysis of power and influence in today’s world, we will consider 5 particular individuals—some expected, others perhaps unexpected or even unknown—who are calling the shots in global affairs today. The lecture concludes with a detailed look at what their influence means for our global future.

William Burke-White / University of Pennsylvania
William Burke-White is the Richard Perry Professor and Inaugural Director of the Perry World House at the University of Pennsylvania. He served in the Obama Administration from 2009-2011 on Secretary Clinton's Policy Planning Staff. He was also principal drafter of the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review, Secretary Clinton's hallmark foreign policy and institutional reform effort. Professor Burke-White has received the Levin Award and the Gorman award for Excellence in Teaching.

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM
Powerful Memory Secrets

Peter Vishton / College of William and Mary

What was the name of your first pet? Where did you put your house keys? How do you get to work every morning? Most likely, you didn't need to look up the answers to these questions. You remembered them. Memory is, without a doubt, the most powerful (and practical) tool. By linking both your past and your future, memory gives you the power to plan, to reason, to perceive, and to understand. As long as thinking and insight are important in how we live our lives, memory will be critical as well. And the better your memory, the more information you'll have at your immediate disposal and the better your thinking will be. Yet while all of us have an amazing capacity for memory, there are plenty of times when it seems to fail us.

 

Why does this happen? And how can you fix it? According to award-winning Professor Peter M. Vishton of The College of William and Mary, an engaging cognitive scientist who has spent decades studying the secrets of human memory, the problem is simple. "Our brains were not really built for the types of memory challenges we give them in classrooms, offices, and throughout our daily lives," he says, "So the central trick to enhancing the power of your memory is to transform things that are hard to remember into things that are easier for your brain to encode and later recall.” This insight lies at the heart of his captivating course. You'll explore the real research (not the fads) on how memory functions—and then apply these findings to help you make better use of the memory abilities you have. By tapping into a series of scientifically proven strategies, tricks, and techniques, and by practicing them through dynamic exercises, you'll emerge from this short course with the ability to process information more effectively and increase your chance of remembering almost anything you want.

Peter Vishton / College of William and Mary
Peter Vishton is an Associate Professor of psychology at the College of William and Mary. He is the Program Director of the Developmental and Learning Sciences at the National Science Foundation. He is also the Human Interface Developer at R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company.

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM
Rhapsody in Blue: Gershwin's Amazing, Insanely Great Masterpiece!

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University

Gershwin wrote his first hit songs at the age of 19, and was a successful songwriter from then on. He created concert works out of melodies and rhythms that come out of the popular music of his day - Broadway ballads, ragtime, Latin dance rhythms, and the Blues. Professor Grossman's lecture will demonstrate the unique way Gershwin composed, including his very first and most popular concert work, Rhapsody in Blue. And yes – Professor Grossman (who is a concert level pianist) will play excerpts from that American masterpiece.

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University
Orin Grossman is renowned internationally for his knowledge of music. He lectures and performs concerts throughout the US and Europe, he teaches Performing Arts at Fairfield University, and has served as the University's Academic Vice President. Professor Grossman has been particularly associated with the music of George Gershwin, performing concerts of his song transcriptions and classical pieces to critical praise around the world, including performances in Cairo and New York. Professor Grossman was also chosen to play for the New York City Mayor's Awards of Honor for Arts and Culture.

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