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One Day University: 8 Professors / with Dallas Morning News

May 30, 2015 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM

One Day University and The Dallas Morning News have partnered to bring you a fascinating day of learning.

 

Below is a tentative schedule for this event.

 

Starting times for each class may change.

 

You can choose the 4 classes you want to take the day of the event!

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Genius and Creativity: The Science Behind Imagination

Shelley Carson / Harvard University

Human creativity, sometimes rising to the level of genius, is essential to our ability to survive and thrive as a species. In the arts it enriches our lives, transforms our moods, and transmits culture from generation to generation, while in the sciences it improves our health and living conditions, and opens the worlds of outer space and inner space to our scrutiny and amazement. In addition, in our business and personal lives  it allows us to stay competitive and adds breadth to our everyday experiences. But where do genius and creativity come from? Is it determined by our genes? Can it be taught and enhanced?

In this talk, Dr. Carson will take you inside the brain to glimpse the creative process. She will describe some of the fascinating findings from neuroscience and molecular biology that are revealing the mysteries of creativity, genius and imagination. You will learn how we can use information gleaned from the lives of "mad" geniuses to enhance our own unique expression of creativity. You will also participate in creativity-evoking exercises and receive valuable tips for amping up your creative life.

Shelley Carson / Harvard University
Shelley Carson is an associate of the psychology department and a lecturer at Harvard University. Her research on creativity has been featured on CNN, the Discovery Channel, the BBC, and NPR. She is author of the award-winning book "Your Creative Brain: Seven Steps to Maximize Imagination, Productivity, and Innovation in your Life," and co-author of "Almost Depressed: Is Your (or Your Loved One's) Unhappiness a Problem?" Dr. Carson received the Petra T. Shattuck Excellence in Teaching Award at Harvard.

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
China and the US: Dangerous Rivalry or Peaceful Coexistence?

Jacques deLisle / University of Pennsylvania

The relationship between the United States and China is routinely, and rightly, described as the world’s most important bilateral relationship, but it is also an ambivalent relationship. U.S. foreign policy has pivoted to Asia, primarily to address the implications of a rising China. With a new generation of leaders freshly in power, China is at a crossroads, and a possible turning point, in its path of economic development and economic relations with the outside world, in the choice between more reform and more repression in its internal politics, and in decisions about how it will use its growing power in dealing with its neighbors, the United States, and the international system.

 

Since the “opening to China” in the early 1970s, U.S. policy toward China has emphasized positive engagement and hedged engagement with elements of what China complains is containment. How will, and should, the U.S. deal with a China that is increasingly formidable yet potentially fragile and that is deeply interdependent with the United States and vital to handling global issues yet also has interests and agendas that at times - and perhaps increasingly - conflict with those of the United States?

Jacques deLisle / University of Pennsylvania
Jacques deLisle is a Stephen A. Cozen Professor of Law and a professor of political science at the University of Pennsylvania. Professor deLisle is also the director of the Center for East Asian Studies research and teaching focus on contemporary Chinese law and politics. He has served frequently as an expert witness on issues of law and government policies and advisor to legal reform, development, and education programs, primarily in China.

11:00 AM - 12:20 PM
The Great Recession - Will It Happen Again? When Bad Things Happen to Good Economies

Michael Klein / Tufts University

Someday your grandchildren may ask you “Do you remember the Lehman weekend, and the Great Recession?”, just as you may have asked your grandparents about Black Friday and the Great Depression. In September 2008, the financial system came very close to total collapse, and the subsequent Great Recession has been the worst economic downturn in the post-war period. In this session, we will discuss the most significant economic event since the 1930s.

 

Was the United States, before 2008, really a “good economy,” or did its relative robustness mask deep problems? What were the seeds of the Great Recession, and when were they sown? How were its causes similar to the sources of the Great Depression? Why was this recession so much worse than other post-World War II downturns? And, despite how bad things got, how did unprecedented policies based on lessons drawn from the Great Depression avoid the deep, prolonged economic distress of the 1930s? Finally, as engaged citizens, what can we learn from the past few years about issues that are likely to be the sources of debate about the economy for years to come.

Michael Klein / Tufts University
Michael Klein is the William L. Clayton Professor of International Economic Affairs at Tufts University. He served as the Chief Economist in the Office of International Affairs of the United States Department of the Treasury from 2010-2011. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Non-Resident Senior Fellow of the Brookings Institution, and an Associate editor of the Journal of International Economics. He has been a visiting scholar at the International Monetary Fund, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve, the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, and the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

11:00 AM - 12:20 PM
Five Films that Changed America

Marc Lapadula / Yale University

While most works of cinema are produced for mass-entertainment and escapism, a peculiar minority have had a profound influence on our culture. Whether intentionally or not, some movies have brought social issues to light, changed laws, forwarded ideologies both good and bad, and altered the course of American history through their resounding impact on society. Renowned Yale Film Professor Marc Lapadula will discuss several films that, for better or worse, made their mark.

 

I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang
The Graduate
Easy Rider
China Syndrome
Jaws

Marc Lapadula / Yale University
Marc Lapadula is a Senior Lecturer in the Film Studies Program at Yale University. He is a playwright, screenwriter and an award-winning film producer. In addition to Yale, Marc has taught at Columbia University's Graduate Film School, created the screenwriting programs at both The University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins where he won Outstanding Teaching awards and has lectured on film, playwriting and conducted highly-acclaimed screenwriting seminars all across the country at notable venues like The National Press Club, The Smithsonian Institution, The Commonwealth Club and The New York Historical Society.

1:40 PM - 2:55 PM
How Americans Think About Punishment, Revenge, Anger, and Forgiveness

Austin Sarat / Amherst College

Justice is a deeply perplexing idea. Everyone seems to have their own idea about what justice requires. In this lecture we explore one of those ideas, namely that justice means giving people what they deserve. We will ask, “What is the relationship of justice and punishment, and how we can we decide whether a punishment is just and proportional?” Examples will include the biblical story of Job and the history of punishment in the United States as well as the contemporary debate about America’s use of capital punishment. We will consider whether it is the commitment to "just deserts" as the measure of justice in punishment, that plays such an important role in a new national conversation about the death penalty.

Austin Sarat / Amherst College
Austin Sarat is William Nelson Cromwell professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science at Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts. He has written, co-written, or edited more than ninety books in the fields of law and political science. Professor Sarat has received the the Stan Wheeler Award for his excellence as a teacher and mentor, awarded by the Law and Society Association.

1:40 PM - 2:55 PM
Untangling the Web: Why the Middle East is a Mess and Always Has Been

Ori Z. Soltes / Georgetown University

The problems of the Middle East are usually considered from far too narrow a viewpoint. There are experts and authorities who understand the ins and outs of one or two aspects of it, but rarely does one encounter a discussion that encompasses the extraordinary array of complications that make this region so difficult. The intention of this lecture is to make that array of complications more accessible. The goal is not to propose a specific solution, but to explore and explain the problem as a starting point for thinking about solutions, and to present different issues evenhandedly, from different perspectives, which is also too rare in discussions of the region.

The Middle East is a web in which threads interweave in a snarling tangle: religion, ethnicity, politics, nationality and economics. This class will attempt to unravel—to isolate and elucidate—the threads that make up the web, as opposed to re-organizing them into a nice, neat tapestry. Neatness is hardly possible, but clarity is. To ignore any one of the threads is to ignore what to some group is important. The audience will not walk away imagining that the region may be easily disentangled or that it is a problem easily solved—but that it may be understood.

Ori Z. Soltes / Georgetown University
Ori Z. Soltes teaches theology, philosophy, politics and art history at Georgetown University. For seven years, Professor Soltes was Director and Chief Curator of the B'nai B'rith Klutznick National Jewish Museum, where he curated over 80 exhibitions focusing on aspects of history, ethnography and contemporary art. He has also curated diverse contemporary and historical exhibits at other sites, nationally and internationally. He is the author of sixteen books, including "Untangling the Web: A Thinking Person's Guide to Why the Middle East is a Mess and Always has been."

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM
The Beatles, The Sixties, and Popular Culture

Jeremy Yudkin / Boston University

American and English culture of the 1960s is reflected more in the music of the Beatles than in that of any other group.  The rise of the Beatles coincided with a vital shift in the relationship between the two countries and a change in the significance, relevance, and artistic ambitions of popular music.  Between October 5, 1962 and May 8, 1970, the Beatles released twenty-two singles, several EPs, and eleven albums.  They amassed an enormous worldwide fan base that continues to exist to this day.  The group shattered many sales records and charted more than fifty top-40 hit singles.  They have been called the most iconic music group of modern times.  
 
We shall talk about Beatles songs, the culture of the times, and America and England of the Fifties and Sixties.  We shall see filmed interviews with John, Paul, George, and Ringo, and we shall listen closely to some of their greatest songs.  This multi-media experience will leave you more knowledgeable about the most volatile decade of the twentieth century and more enthusiastic about the music of the Beatles than ever before.

Jeremy Yudkin / Boston University
Jeremy Yudkin is Professor of Music and and Director of the Center for Beethoven Research at Boston University. In 2009 he won the Award for Excellence in Historical Recorded Sound Research from the Association for Recorded Sound Collections for his book "Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop." He has been nominated six times for Boston University's Excellence in Teaching Awards.

3:15 PM - 4:30 PM
The Science of Success

Catherine Sanderson / Amherst College

What Predicts Success? Many people focus on the importance of cognitive intelligence in predicting academic and professional success. But a growing amount of evidence suggests that other traits - including the ability to control impulses, manage adversity, find internal motivation, and build relationships - are essential in achieving the best outcomes in both personal and professional relationships. This talk will therefore focus on the importance of so-called emotional intelligence (or EQ) in predicting success, and provide specific strategies for increasing your own EQ.

Catherine Sanderson / Amherst College
Catherine Sanderson is the Manwell Family Professor of Psychology at Amherst College. Her research has received grant funding from the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Health. Professor Sanderson has published over 25 journal articles and book chapters in addition to four college textbooks, a high school health textbook, and a popular press book on parenting. In 2012, she was named one of the country's top 300 professors by the Princeton Review. Professor Sanderson speaks regularly for public and corporate audiences on topics such as the science of happiness, the power of emotional intelligence, the mind-body connection, and the psychology of good and evil. More information on these talks is available on her website: SandersonSpeaking.com.

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