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One Day University: Full-Day (10 Professors) in NYC

October 25, 2015 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM

Join One Day University as we present our fall Full-Day event on October 25th. Spend a fascinating day with 10 award-winning professors. You'll experience five thought-provoking talks and countless engaging ideas - all in one day. And don't worry, there are no tests, no grades and no homework. Just the pure joy of lifelong learning!

 

Click here to purchase the MORNING ONLY of this exciting day for just $99.

 

Click here to purchase the AFTERNOON ONLY of this exciting day for just $79.

 

Students will have a 1 hour and 15 minute lunch break. You may bring your own or purchase it at a nearby restaurant.

 

Learn more about National Geographic's Lindblad Expeditions.

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
The Future of Lying and Trusting

Jeffrey Hancock / Stanford University

Let's face it: people lie. From Fortune 500 companies to our government, and even our closest friends, we lie to each other and to ourselves. How is the rewiring of communication in the digital revolution changing how we lie? How can we trust that online review, or that text message about someone being on their way?

In this talk we'll go over the state-of-the-art in deception detection research on how to spot a liar online, explore some new forms of deception, and examine how different technologies affect both how we lie and how we trust online. The talk reveals several key principles that can guide how we can think about deception and truth in this new digital age.

Jeffrey Hancock / Stanford University
Jeffrey Hancock is a Professor of Communications at Stanford University. He was the Chair of the Information Science Department, and the co-Director of Cognitive Science at Cornell University. He is interested in social interactions mediated by information and communication technology, with an emphasis on how people produce and understand language in these contexts. His TED Talk on deception has been seen over 1 million times and he has been featured as a guest on "CBS This Morning" for his expertise on social media.

9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
The Rise of the Ultra Wealthy

Rachel Friedberg / Brown University

The gap between rich and poor in the United States is wider than it has been in almost a century. Indeed, the growth in inequality has arguably been the most important change in American society since the 1970s. Where has all this inequality come from, and can we expect the trend to continue? Most of the increase has occurred because the rich have been getting richer, particularly those at the very top of the income distribution.

What are the implications of this kind of inequality for the American economy, political system, and society? Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis once said “We can either have democracy in this country or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can’t have both.” Do you agree?

Rachel Friedberg / Brown University
Rachel Friedberg is a Distinguished Senior Lecturer in Economics at Brown University. Professor Friedberg's research focuses on the labor market performance and assimilation of immigrants in the United States and Israel, the transferability of human capital, and the impact of immigration on native labor market outcomes.

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM
What We Know About the Universe (and What We Don't Know)

David Helfand / Columbia University

Astronomy is unlike other sciences in that there are no experiments we can perform or expeditions we can mount to manipulate the objects of our study. We are reduced to passively observing the light the Universe sends us, some of which has traveled billions of years before falling on our telescopes. Because the light takes so long to get to us, we are always seeing the past. Far from being a disadvantage, however, this allows us to read history directly by looking out to objects at different distances. 

We can watch stars being born, living out their lives, and then dying in spectacular explosions that produce the elements from which we are made. We can watch how galaxies form and grow by gobbling up their neighbors. And we can map the nearest million galaxies and trace them back to the tiny fluctuations in the early Universe from which they emerged. Replete with colliding galaxies and a fly-through of the Universe set to the Blue Danube waltz, this lecture provides one-stop shopping for a comprehensive tour of all of space and time -- or at least of the whole 4% we actually understand.

David Helfand / Columbia University
David Helfand is a Professor of Astronomy at Columbia University where he served as chair of the Department and co-Director of the Astrophysics Laboratory for 15 years. He is President Emeritus of the American Astronomical Society and of Quest University Canada. He has received the Columbia Presidential Teaching Award and the Great Teacher Award from the Society of Columbia Graduates. He is also the author of the new book, "A Survival Guide to the Misinformation Age."

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM
Why Americans Dislike Politics and Politicians

Jennifer Lawless / American University

With more than 500,000 elected positions in the United States, the American political system can only sustain itself and succeed if a large number of citizens eventually put themselves forward for public service. But Washington’s performance over the past two decades, with an increase in partisanship, prolonged stalemates, and numerous scandals, has taken a toll on the American people. The mean-spirited, dysfunctional political system that has come to characterize American politics has turned people off to the idea of engaging in politics. And it has turned the next generation off to running for office.

In this lecture, Jennifer L. Lawless will present new data about people’s opinions about contemporary politics and their political ambition (or lack of it). She’ll also explain why young Americans, in particular, feel completely alienated from contemporary politics and express little aspiration to run for office in the future. Through an original, national survey of more than 4,000 high school and college students, as well as more than 100 in-depth interviews, she will demonstrate that the overwhelming majority view the political system as ineffective, broken, and unappealing. But Professor Lawless’ message is not one of all gloom and doom. She will also provide practical suggestions for how new technologies, national service programs, and well-strategized public service campaigns could turn things around.

Jennifer Lawless / American University
Jennifer Lawless is a nationally recognized expert on women's involvement in politics. She is the author of "Becoming a Candidate: Political Ambition and the Decision to Run for Office" and the co-author of the book, "It Still Takes a Candidate: Why Women Don't Run for Office". She has also issued several policy reports on the barriers that impede women's candidate emergence.

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
The Best (And Worst) Presidents

Akhil Amar / Yale University

The presidency has always been America’s most personal office, yet these personalities fit into larger historical patterns. Certain presidents are generally reckoned “great”—Washington and Lincoln top almost everyone’s list—and these great presidents are united by certain intriguing similarities. But there are also obvious differences. Washington brought extraordinary military expertise to the presidency; Lincoln, almost none. Washington was a profound symbol of national unity: in each of America’s first two elections, Washington received the unanimous support of the electoral college. Lincoln, by contrast, was intensely polarizing, receiving not a single electoral vote—or popular vote!—south of Virginia in 1860.

 

In this wide-ranging lecture, Professor Akhil Amar will explore patterns of presidential greatness and ignominy. Which presidents are generally considered great, and which are at the bottom of the reputational heap? Why? Have ratings changed over time? Do presidential experts diverge from ordinary citizens in their rankings? Where will our current president likely rank in the eyes of future historians and political scientists?

Akhil Amar / Yale University
Akhil Amar is Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale University. Professor Amar is the co-editor of a leading constitutional law casebook, "Processes of Constitutional Decisionmaking." He is also the author of several books, including "The Constitution and Criminal Procedure: First Principles," "The Bill of Rights: Creation and Reconstruction," "America's Constitution: A Biography," and most recently, "America's Unwritten Constitution: The Precedents and Principles We Live By."

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

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2:15 PM - 3:15 PM
4 Films That Changed America

Marc Lapadula / Johns Hopkins University

While most movies are mass-produced entertainment and escapism, there are some that have had a profound impact on culture. Whether intentionally or not, some films have brought social issues to light, affected laws, forwarded ideologies both good and bad, and generally changed the course of history through their impact on society. Renowned Yale Film Professor Marc Lapadula will discuss four films that, for better or worse, made their mark.

 

The Jazz Singer
I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang
Easy Rider
T
he Graduate

Marc Lapadula / Johns Hopkins University
Marc Lapadula is a Senior Lecturer in the Film Studies Program at both Yale University and Johns Hopkins. He is a playwright, screenwriter and an award-winning film producer. In addition to Yale, Marc has taught at Columbia University's Graduate Film School, created the screenwriting programs at both The University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins where he won Outstanding Teaching awards and has lectured on film, playwriting and conducted highly-acclaimed screenwriting seminars all across the country at notable venues like The National Press Club, The Smithsonian Institution, and The New York Historical Society.

2:15 PM - 3:15 PM

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3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
What (Almost) Nobody Knows About WWII

Carol Anderson / Emory University

World War II is arguably the most tragic episode in human history. The six year war, with its European epicentre, spread to all corners of the globe with countless men, women and children affected by the struggle. Millions were killed on the battlefield, in the air, on the sea and in the cities and countryside across Europe. Let alone the estimated 6 million Jews that were killed by the Nazi's in accordance with Hitler's gross plan to exterminate their entire race.

 

Everybody knows the chronology. Everybody knows how and why the Allies won. Yet during a war this complex and lengthy, there are dozens of shocking incidents that occurred that are less notorious. From secret agreements that shaped the post war world, to extraordinary individuals, World War II threw up a series of surprises.

Carol Anderson / Emory University
Carol Anderson is a professor of history at Emory University. She is the author of "Eyes off the Prize: The United Nations and the African-American Struggle for Human Rights, 1944-1955," which was awarded both the Gustavus Myers and Myrna Bernath Book Awards. She has received numerous teaching awards, including the Crystal Apple Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Education, William T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence, the Mizzou Class of '39 Outstanding Faculty Award, the Most Inspiring Professor Award from the Athletic Department, the Gold Chalk Award for Outstanding Graduate Teaching, and the Provost's Teaching Award for Outstanding Junior Faculty.

3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
The Illusion of Attention: What We Miss When We Think We See Everything

Brian Scholl / Yale University

Our intuitions about how our minds work are fantastically poor guides to how our minds actually work. Nowhere is this more true than in the study of perception: seeing seems intuitively to be the fastest, most natural, and most effortless of mental activities -- something you do thousands of times every day while taking it for granted. Yet this ease masks a fascinating array of subtle processing beneath the surface of our conscious awareness.

This talk will illustrate several key themes from the science of how we see -- and how we sometimes fail to consciously perceive the world in front of us. We'll see demonstrations in which salient objects disappear right in front of your eyes, even as you carefully attend to them; demonstrations where solid real-world objects appear to morph and bend as you manipulate them; and demonstrations where simple geometric shapes irresistibly appear to be alive. These and other examples will illustrate how visual perception is far richer and more complicated than we might expect -- and how cognitive science can help us come to understand it.

Brian Scholl / Yale University
Brian Scholl is a professor of psychology at Yale, where he directs the Perception & Cognition Laboratory. He is a recipient of the 'Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology', and the 'Robert L. Fantz Memorial Award', both from the American Psychological Association. He is currently the only faculty member at Yale to have received both the major prize from the Graduate School, the 'Graduate Mentor Award,' and the major prize in the social sciences from Yale College, the 'Lex Hixon Prize for Teaching Excellence in the Social Sciences.'

SOLD OUT!

Sorry this event is sold out.

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