New Classes. New Cities. Discounts and More!

One Day University with the San Francisco Chronicle

September 23, 2017 9:30 AM – 4:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Why Some People Are Resilient, and Others Are Not

Andrew Shatte / University of Arizona

In this fast-paced, interactive, and fun session Dr. Andrew Shatté will lead you on a tour of the big questions in the psychology of resilience. Why does one person overcome adversity while another falls into helplessness? What are the 7 ingredients that make up resilience - and do you have them?

We will see that habits in how we think have an enormous impact on resilience. You will gain insight into two of your thinking styles and learn about the impact they can have on your success, happiness, and health. Dr. Shatté will show you how to boost resilience with case studies from his work in large corporations and the public sector. And in the final moments of the workshop, he'll even reveal the biggest secret to a life of resilience!

Andrew Shatte / University of Arizona
Andrew Shatté teaches psychology at the University of Arizona, and is also the founder and President of Mindflex, a training company that specializes in measuring and training for resilience. Professor Shatté first joined One Day University when he was a professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was given the "Best Professor" award by the students in 2003 and received the Dean's award for distinguished teaching in 2006. He co-wrote "The Resilience Factor," and "Mequilibrium."

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM
What We Know About the Universe (and What We Don't Know)

David Helfand / Columbia University

Astronomy is unlike other sciences in that there are no experiments we can perform or expeditions we can mount to manipulate the objects of our study. We are reduced to passively observing the light the Universe sends us, some of which has traveled billions of years before falling on our telescopes. Because the light takes so long to get to us, we are always seeing the past. Far from being a disadvantage, however, this allows us to read history directly by looking out to objects at different distances. 

We can watch stars being born, living out their lives, and then dying in spectacular explosions that produce the elements from which we are made. We can watch how galaxies form and grow by gobbling up their neighbors. And we can map the nearest million galaxies and trace them back to the tiny fluctuations in the early Universe from which they emerged. Replete with colliding galaxies and a fly-through of the Universe set to the Blue Danube waltz, this lecture provides one-stop shopping for a comprehensive tour of all of space and time -- or at least of the whole 4% we actually understand.

David Helfand / Columbia University
David Helfand is a Professor of Astronomy at Columbia University where he served as chair of the Department and co-Director of the Astrophysics Laboratory for 15 years. He is President Emeritus of the American Astronomical Society and of Quest University Canada. He has received the Columbia Presidential Teaching Award and the Great Teacher Award from the Society of Columbia Graduates. He is also the author of the new book, "A Survival Guide to the Misinformation Age."

12:15 PM - 1:30 AM
Lunch Break

1 hour and 15 minute / Lunch Break

Students will have a 1 hour and 15 minute lunch break.

1:30 PM - 2:45 PM
Learning From The Roman Empire: Are we Repeating Their Rise and Decline?

Caroline Winterer / Stanford University

The rise and fall of ancient Rome is one of the greatest stories in the history of the world. From a group of settlements huddled along the Tiber in Italy, Rome rose to conquer much of the Mediterranean world and Europe. At the height of the Roman Empire, one in every five people in the world lived within its territory.

For Americans, Rome's unlikely ascent, spectacular ambitions, and gruesome decline have provided endless fuel for our national self-examination. Is the United States an empire? Are empires good or bad? What makes great civilizations decline and fall—and how can America avoid that fate? This talk will explore the great American question—"Are We Rome?"—and show why this ancient empire continues to fascinate our very modern nation.

Caroline Winterer / Stanford University
Caroline Winterer is Anthony P. Meier Family Professor in the Humanities at Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Humanities Center. Her latest book is, "American Enlightenments: Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason." She is a recipient of an American Ingenuity Award from the Smithsonian Institution for mapping the social network of Benjamin Franklin, and is also a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians.

3:00 PM - 4:15 PM
The Human Brain: What We Know (and what we don't)

David Eagleman / Stanford University

Locked in the silence and darkness of your skull, your brain fashions the rich narratives of your reality and your identity. Join renowned neuroscientist David Eagleman for a journey into the questions at the mysterious heart of our existence. What is reality? Who are "you"? How do you make decisions? Why does your brain need other people? How is technology poised to change what it means to be human?

In this class, Professor Eagleman will guides you through the world of extreme sports, criminal justice, facial expressions, genocide, brain surgery, gut feelings, robotics, and the search for immortality. Strap in for a whistle-stop tour into the inner cosmos. In the infinitely dense tangle of billions of brain cells and their trillions of connections, something emerges that you might not have expected to see in there: you. This is class will show you how your life shapes your brain, and how your brain shapes your life.

David Eagleman / Stanford University
David Eagleman is a professor at Stanford University, a neuroscientist, and a New York Times bestselling author. He is the writer and presenter of the international PBS series, "The Brain with David Eagleman." He is a TED speaker, a Guggenheim Fellow, a winner of the McGovern Award for Excellence in Biomedical Communication, a Next Generation Texas Fellow, Vice-Chair on the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Neuroscience & Behaviour, a research fellow in the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, Chief Scientific Advisor for the Mind Science Foundation, and a board member of The Long Now Foundation. He was named Science Educator of the Year by the Society for Neuroscience.

SOLD OUT!

Sorry this event is sold out.

Please call 1-800-300-3438 to be added to the waiting list.