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One Day University SOLD OUT - Featuring 12 Professors
April 21,2013

On Sunday, April 21st  our adult students-for-a-day will choose the five presentations they want to attend from the list of classes and professors below.

Professors and Tentative Schedule



9:30am - 10:35am

Neuroscience
How the Brain Works: Why We Do What We Do
Marvin Chun / Yale

Philosophy
Who was Confucius and What Did He Really Say?
Bryan Van Norden / Vassar

Business
The Culture of Hits: Why Some People and Products Become Wildly Successful
Kartik Hosanagar / Penn

Music
The Art of Listening: What Makes Great Music Great?
Orin Grossman/ Fairfield


10:50am - 11:55am

Art
What's so Great About Michelangelo?
William Wallace / Washington University

Political Science
China, Russia & India: The Rise of the Rest
Stephen Kotkin / Princeton

Psychology
Genius, Creativity, and Depression. Is There a Link?
Shelley Carson / Harvard

Health
Aging: How it Affects Our Minds, Bodies, and Relationships
Sherwin Nuland / Yale

12:10pm - 1:15pm

Neuroscience
How the Brain Works: Why We Do What We Do
Marvin Chun / Yale

Music
The Art of Listening: What Makes Great Music Great?
Orin Grossman/ Fairfield

Psychology
The Psychology of Money
Jeff Hancock / Cornell

Philosophy
Who was Confucius and What Did He Really Say?
Bryan Van Norden / Vassar


LUNCH AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE



2:05pm - 3:10pm

Art
What's so Great About Michelangelo?
William Wallace / Washington University

Psychology
The Psychology of Money
Jeff Hancock / Cornell

Political Science
China, Russia & India: The Rise of the Rest
Stephen Kotkin / Princeton


Health
Aging: How it Affects Our Minds, Bodies, and Relationships
Sherwin Nuland / Yale

3:25pm - 4:30pm

Psychology
Genius, Creativity, and Depression: Is There a Link?
Shelley Carson / Harvard

History 
The Civil War: What We Know Now
Louis Masur  / Rutgers 

Education
What's Right and What's Wrong With College in America?
Andrew Delbanco / Columbia
 

Ethics
Can War Have Rules? Military Technology and Human Rights
Nina Tannenwald / Brown



Course Descriptions



Aging : How it Affects our Minds, Bodies, and Relationships
Sherwin Nuland / Yale


The onset of aging is usually so gradual that we are surprised to one day find that it is already upon us. Though its disabilities are well known --- involving joints, arteries, vision, hearing, strength, coordination, memory, mental quickness ---- most men and women are less aware that measures exist that can slow the process and even reverse much of its effect if properly applied. The gerontologic research of the past two decades has provided us with means and methods within the reach of all of us, to lessen and sometimes prevent the worst of the changes that an earlier generation thought inevitable. This session deals with the ways in which aging affects our bodies and minds, and the relatively straightforward ways in which nature has equipped our species to combat them. There is no way to slow the passing of years, and certain changes are beyond control. But others are susceptible to change, and the intention of this mini-course is to enable that to happen.

 

 

The Culture of Hits : Why Some People and Products Become Wildly Successful
Kartik Hosanager / Penn


What do the movie Toy Story, Youtube hit Gangnam Style, musician Lady Gaga, game FarmVille and tech company Google have in common? They are all rare hits in hit-driven industries. Movies, music, gaming, Venture Capital and many other industries may look very different on the surface but they all have surprisingly similar characteristics. The vast majority of initiatives in these industries fail and success for companies are defined by the rare blockbuster. In this session, the instructor will walk us through the surprising similarities between these industries and explain what Google can learn from Lady Gaga or your company can learn from Gangnam Style. The session will introduce us to the art of producing that blockbuster.

 

 

What’s So Great About Michelangelo?
William E. Wallace / Washington University


This year we celebrate the 500th anniversary of the unveiling of Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel ceiling. If any work of art demonstrates artistic genius, it is this well-known masterpiece. No matter how familiar the images, no matter the trials of that crowded space, few visitors have not felt awe standing under this titanic achievement. Like a handful of timeless monuments – the pyramids, the Taj Mahal and the Great Wall of China among them -- the Sistine never fails to astonish us. In many ways the ceiling is a compendium: of Michelangelo's art, of the Renaissance, of Christian theology. Like Verdi’s Requiem or Milton’s Paradise Lost, the ceiling is a transcendent work of genius that is never exhausted through looking or describing. In the words of the great German writer, Johann Goethe: "Until you have seen the Sistine Chapel, you can have no adequate conception of what man is capable of accomplishing." Professor Wallace, a world-renowned authority on Michelangelo, will illuminate this masterpiece and help you see it with fresh eyes.



How the Brain Works: Why We Behave The Way We Do
Marvin Chun / Yale


This class will highlight the recent advances in medical imaging that have given psychologists and neuroscientists unprecedented access to the inner workings of the human mind. Professor Chun will discuss what brain imaging can reveal about the unconscious thoughts, memories, emotions and even social biases that influence our everyday behavior. Behavioral Neuroscience explores the ways we can explain why we act as we do by understanding the influences of biological processes. We'll explore answers by looking at the relationship between brain activity and subjective experience.



How To Listen To (And Appreciate) Great Music
Orin Grossman / Fairfield


This class will introduce various different ways to enhance the listening experience of great music. Although no one lecture can walk down all the possible avenues, we will take a comprehensive approach to the act of listening itself. Assuming that historical information, knowledge of the composer's life and times, and a general understanding of the eras of musical style can all be important ways to appreciate further any great piece of music, this lecture will instead focus on specific concepts of listening that transcend any one composer, style or genre.

 

We will focus in particular on a concept sometimes called musical texture-how much is going on at any one time and how can we absorb it? Unlike a complex painting, which allows us to stand in front of it for as much time as needed to absorb and appreciate subtleties of form, color, design against the overall impact and meaning of the painting a piece of music exists in a fixed time. We have to get as much musical information as we can as it drifts by our ears. Great composers and musicians, from Bach to Ellington, enjoy varying textures by moving in the same piece from a simple melody with a few back-up chords to complex moments with two melodies and more unusual chords occurring simultaneously. Understanding how to listen for these changes is one important way to get more pleasure from the experience of listening. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of musical styles.



Genius, Creativity and Depression: Is there a Link?
Shelley Carson / Harvard


Do you need to have a psychopathology (illness) to be a creative genius? Human creativity is essential to our ability to survive and thrive as a species. Creativity in the arts enriches our everyday experiences, and in the sciences it has extended our lifespan, made living conditions more comfortable, and opened up a myriad of new worlds to scrutiny and amazement. This class looks at the world's most creative achievers to answer questions linking IQ, personality, family life, depression and illness to creativity. Finally, Carson will discuss whether it's possible to enhance creativity and, if so, what strategies can beckon the muse.



What’s Right and What's Wrong With College in America?
Andrew Delbanco / Columbia


As the commercialization of American higher education accelerates, more and more students are coming to college with the narrow aim of obtaining a preprofessional credential. The traditional four-year college experience--an exploratory time for students to discover their passions and test ideas and values with the help of teachers and peers--is in danger of becoming a thing of the past.This class offers a trenchant defense of such an education, and warns that it is becoming a privilege reserved for the relatively rich. It describes the unique strengths of America's colleges in our era of globalization and, while recognizing the growing centrality of science, technology, and vocational subjects in the curriculum, mounts a vigorous defense of a broadly humanistic education for all.



China Russia and India The Rise of the Rest
Stephen Kotkin / Princeton


Think back to the 1970s. The end of the Vietnam War, inflation, America’s rust-belt factories going bust, disco, a stagnant Soviet Union under Leonid Brezhnev, intense global poverty in populous places like socialist India and Communist China, where additionally Mao had imposed the bloodbath of the Cultural Revolution. Now look around today, 40 years later: the Soviet Union is long gone and Russia has a large middle class, India, too, is a market economy with an expanding middle class, and China is the world’s great economic dynamo. What happened? How should we understand these changes? How might things look another 40 years hence?

 

Does the apparent “rise of the rest” portend a decline in American power and influence? Is American power actually declining? Is America’s place in the world, in fact, changing? Should it change? Or, is the “rise of the rest” just a temporary phenomenon, overhyped, a marketing slogan? Might China instead crash? Are India and Russia set for reversals, too? What are the real strengths and weaknesses of China, India, and Russia? More broadly, what lessons can we draw from these cases about global geopolitics and the world in which our children and grandchildren might live?



Who Was Confucius and What Did He Really Say?
Bryan W. Van Norden / Vassar College


Confucius has been the subject of controversy for over two and a half millennia. He has been venerated as the perfect sage, China’s “uncrowned king,” who always did and said exactly the right thing in each situation. However, even in his own lifetime he was the subject of controversy, accused by some of hypocrisy, mindless traditionalism, or impractical idealism. The controversy has continued into the 20th century. During the Cultural Revolution, radicals angrily dismissed Confucius as a “decadent feudal reactionary.” Today, though, the Chinese government proudly funds “Confucius Institutes” in other countries.

 

So who was Confucius really? In this lecture we examine the social context and the life experiences that made Confucius who he was. We then explore several major themes that are evident in the thought of Confucius himself, and every later thinker who proudly bears the label “Confucian.” Students will gain from this course a deeper appreciation of one of the seminal figures of world history, as well as a better sense for how he has influenced, and continues to shape, Chinese civilization.



The Civil War: What We Know Now
Louis Masur / Rutgers


The Civil War transformed American society and, 150 years later, interest in the conflict has not diminished. The war settled the question of whether the nation would endure and the fate of slavery, but it also unleashed forces that have continued to generate debate and shape society. In the past few decades, a wealth of new scholarship has illuminated previously unknown aspects of the war and offered new interpretations of the era’s events.

 

This lecture explores our current understanding of the war and its aftermath. Among the topics to be discussed are the debate over how the Union won the war, the story of women and children on the homefront, medical treatment and casualties, the meanings of freedom, and new insights into political and military leadership, particularly Lincoln, Grant, Davis and Lee.



The Psychology of Money
Jeff Hancock / Cornell

 

A wealthy man is one who earns $100 a year more than his wife's sister's husband. It turns out that H.L. Mencken's "definition" is more true than we might imagine, and it has implications for how we should think about money, wealth and even what kind of country we want to live in. In this class we'll go dig into some of the most pressing issues in the U.S. today. of our time: wealth, inequality, and what the psychology of money has to say about it. We'll start by asking whether there actually is wealth inequality in America, with the answer coming from you, the audience! We'll then discover whether it matters if there is inequality, and if it does, why. Lastly, we'll look at some of the key psychological factors that lead us to feel wealthy, or not.



Can War Have Rules? Military Technology and Human Rights
Nina Tannenwald / Brown

 

In September 2011, Anwar al-Awlaki, an American-born Muslim cleric who had been on the CIA’s terrorist list, was deliberately killed by a U.S. drone strike in Yemen. Human rights groups objected that this act of targeted killing was really an extrajudicial assassination. If we can kill an American suspect in Yemen, a country with whom the United States is not at war, they worried, what’s to stop the use of a drone strike to take out a terrorist or even, say, drug dealers, in Chicago?

 

The use of unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, to target suspected terrorists in non-battlefield settings has become an essential, yet controversial, feature of the U.S. “war on terror.” Supporters praise it as a highly effective way to eliminate elusive Al Qaeda terrorists. Yet critics worry that drone technology gives unprecedented power to kill away from the traditional battlefield and without legal accountability or due process, and that many innocent civilians have been killed in the strikes. Further, U.S. officials have said little about the legal basis for this policy. This session will examine the debate surrounding drone warfare and other new military technologies such as “killer” robots that enable “remote” killing. Are drone killings legal? Are they legitimate? Are they morally justified? Are they effective? Do they undermine the rules of war? Does the fight against terrorists, who specifically reject the laws of war, justify setting aside some of the traditional laws of war designed to protect civilians? Or should there be rules even in the war on terror? The United States is by far the leading user of drones for targeted killings, but what happens when the technology spreads to China, Iran, Russia? What rules would the United States want then?

 

 

 


New York Hilton
1335 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10019
April 21,2013
9:30 AM - 4:30 PM