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One Day University: A Day of Genius and Creativity (San Francisco)

February 10, 2018 9:30 AM – 4:00 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
The Musical Genius of Mozart

Craig Wright / Yale University

When asked to provide a list of “geniuses” in Western cultural history, virtually all respondents would include the name Mozart. What is it in Mozart's music that makes it among the most sublime ever written? What personal traits did Mozart possess that enabled him to create music of this extraordinary quality?

Using live music and video clips from operas, as well as from the film Amadeus, we will explore the enormous diversity of Mozart's music. At the same time, by examining color photographs of his autograph manuscripts and draft sketches, we will witness Mozart's attention to the smallest detail. Having explored his music in both breadth and depth, our attention turns finally to the enablers of Mozart's genius: genetic gifts, mentoring, motivation, concentration, self-confidence, and just plain luck. By the end of this session, we will come to see that not only is Mozart's music great, but Mozart himself was unique, and arguably the most extraordinary creator ever to set foot on this planet.

Craig Wright / Yale University
Professor Craig Wright is the Henry L. and Lucy G. Moses Professor of Music at Yale. Professor Wright's courses include his perennially popular introductory course "Listening to Music," his selective seminar "Exploring the Nature of Genius" and other specialized courses ranging from ancient Greek music theory to the music of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, Bach and Mozart. He was awarded the International Musicological Society's Edward J. Dent Medal and the American Musicological Society's Alfred Einstein Prize and Otto Kinkeldey Award - making him one of the few individuals to hold all three honors.

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
The Artistic Genius of Michelangelo

Tina Rivers Ryan / Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo), Formerly Columbia University

A leader of the High Renaissance of the early sixteenth century, Michelangelo Buonarroti was legendary even in his own time for his inventiveness as an artist: Giorgio Vasari, the godfather of art history, wrote that he had been endowed by God with "universal ability in every art and every profession…to the end that the world might choose him and admire him as its highest exemplar in the life, works, saintliness of character, and every action of human creatures, and that he might be acclaimed by us as a being rather divine than human."

In this talk, we will trace the arc of Michelangelo's storied life, from his upbringing by the powerful Medici family, to his glory days as architect and artist to the Popes, and his spiritual re-awakening late in life. Along the way, we will look closely at his paintings and sculptures, including the Sistine Chapel ceiling, the Last Judgment, the Pietà, and the David, in order to understand the importance of his unique artistic vision. Through his works, we will come to better understand the man behind the legend--a passionate artist and competitive rival to the likes of Raphael and Bramante--whose outstanding achievements and temperament gave rise to the modern notion of the artistic "genius.”

Tina Rivers Ryan / Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo), Formerly Columbia University
An art historian by training, Dr. Tina Rivers Ryan is currently a curator at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York. She holds five degrees in art history, including a BA from Harvard and a PhD from Columbia, and has taught classes on art at museums including The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, as well as at the University at Buffalo, the Pratt Institute, and Columbia, where she was one of the top-ranked instructors of the introduction to art history. A regular critic for Artforum, the world's leading art publication, her writing also has appeared in scholarly journals and books, and in catalogs published by museums across America and Europe.

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
The Remarkable Genius of Einstein

Matthew Stanley / New York University

Einstein's name is synonymous with genius. His wild-haired, thoughtful-eyed face has become an icon of modern science. His ideas changed the way we see the universe, the meaning of truth, and the very limits of human knowledge. This course will examine how Einstein’s youthful philosophical questioning led to a revolution in science. We will discuss his creation of special and general relativity, and particularly how these epochal theories emerged from his seemingly simple questions about how we experience the world. His preference for easily-visualizable thought experiments means we will be able to engage deeply with the science with very little mathematics. Einstein also pioneered quantum mechanics, only to reject its strange consequences and eventually devote his life to overturning it through a unified field theory.

Einstein’s elevation to worldwide fame was closely tied to political and social developments such as World War I, Zionism, and the rise of the Nazis. As he became an incarnation of genius, people sought out his views on everything from world peace to the nature of God – and his opinions often had surprising links to his scientific work. The picture of Einstein we end up with is a figure somehow both revolutionary and deeply traditional, emblematic of the modern age and also profoundly uncomfortable with it.

Matthew Stanley / New York University
Matthew Stanley teaches the history and philosophy of science at NYU. He holds degrees in astronomy, religion, physics, and the history of science and is interested in the connections between science and the wider culture. He is the author of "Practical Mystic: Religion, Science, and A. S. Eddington" which examines how scientists reconcile their religious beliefs and professional lives. He has held fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Study, the British Academy, and the Max Planck Institute. Professor Stanley was awarded a 2014-2015 Gallatin Dean's Award for Excellence in Teaching.

1:15 PM - 2:30 PM
Lunch Break

1 hour and 15 minute / Lunch Break

Students will have a 1 hour and 15 minute lunch break.

2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Creativity Workshop: How "Aha!" Really Happens

William Duggan / Columbia Business School

Modern science now understands how creative ideas happen in the human brain. And by learning how it works, you can learn to do it better. In fact, 99% of creative methods in use today around the world use the old -- and wrong -- model of how the brain works. When you ask creative people how they did something, they often feel a bit guilty, because they don't generally perceive they really did anything. It just happened!

Creativity isn't something only scientists and artists enjoy; in fact, all of us use our creative brains every day at home, work and play. Each of us has the ability to increase our mental functioning and creativity, and this session will show you how.

William Duggan / Columbia Business School
William Duggan teaches innovation in three venues at Columbia Business School: MBA and Executive MBA courses, and Executive Education sessions.. He is the author of three recent books on innovation: "Strategic Intuition: The Creative Spark in Human Achievement," "Creative Strategy: A Guide for Innovation," and "The Seventh Sense: How Flashes of Insight Change Your Life." In 2007 the journal Strategy+Business named "Strategic Intuition" the Best Strategy Book of the Year. He has twenty years of experience as a strategy advisor and consultant. In 2014, Professor Duggan won the Dean's Award for Teaching Excellence. He has given talks and workshops on innovation to thousands of executives from companies in countries around the world.

SOLD OUT!

Sorry this event is sold out.

Please call 1-800-300-3438 to be added to the waiting list.