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One Day University with The Dallas Morning News

March 24, 2018 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM

schedule

9:30 AM - 10:35 AM
Three Musical Masterpieces That Changed America

Anna Celenza / Georgetown University

Music permeates our lives. Thanks to technology, it is always with us … via the radio, our smart phones, TV commercials, film music, even the streamed music at our local malls and favorite restaurants. Technology has made it easy for us to put music in the background. The goal of this lecture is to bring it front and center again.

As Professor Celenza will demonstrate, music does not simply reflect culture…it changes it. To demonstrate just how such changes come about, she will highlight three musical masterpieces that changed America. These include: a bawdy 18th-century drinking tune that eventually defined American patriotism, a 1930s ballad that fueled the need for the Civil Rights movement, and a 1980s pop album that changed American foreign policy.

Anna Celenza / Georgetown University
Anna Celenza is the Thomas E. Caestecker Professor of Music at Georgetown University. She is the author of several books, including "Jazz Italian Style: From Its Origins in New Orleans to Fascist Italy and Sinatra." In addition to her scholarly work, she has served as a writer/commentator for NPR's Performance Today and published eight award-winning children's books, among them "Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue" and "Duke Ellington's Nutcracker Suite." She has been featured on nationally syndicated radio and TV programs, including the BBC's "Music Matters" and C-Span's "Book TV."

10:50 AM - 11:55 AM
The Future of American Elections: What Happens Now?

Sam Potolicchio / Georgetown University

Donald Trump's election marked the most stunning political ascent in American history. Trump violated almost every rule of historical campaign practice and triumphed over both the Republican and Democratic establishments. Treated as an unserious joke just 18 months before his victory, Trump's victory shocked the globe. Why were the pollsters so wrong about his prospects? What were the hidden factors that led to President Trump's upset victory?

Trump's early governance as President has been just as disruptive to the common conventions of the Presidency as were his unorthodox campaign methods. What does his governance mean for the future of Presidency? Will presidential elections change and adjust because of Trump's success? Will this victory usher in a new paradigm of politics and new types of presidential aspirants? And if so, should we change the way we pick presidents?

Sam Potolicchio / Georgetown University
Sam Potolicchio is Director of Global and Custom Education at the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University. He was named one of "America's Best Professors" by the Princeton Review, and the Future Leader of American Higher Education by the Association of Colleges and Universities. He also serves as the Department Chairman and Distinguished Professor in Political and Social Communications at the School of Public Policy at the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy. Professor Potolicchio is a visiting professor at NYU and an official lecturer at the Library of Congress for OWLC, an international leadership program of the United States Congress.

12:10 PM - 1:15 PM
The Genius of Darwin: What He Got Right, and What He Got Wrong

Susan Lindee / University of Pennsylvania

Charles Darwin's Origin of Species presented one of the most important ideas in the history of human thought. Darwin's impact over the last 150 years cannot be overstated: his ideas have provided the central organizing core for modern evolutionary science. But DNA had not been discovered, and therefore Darwin could not have foreseen the complexities of modern genetics. He did not understand that certain situations that occur in nature could confer advantages upon organisms that worked as a group instead of as selfish individuals. This fascinating class will bring us up to date on Darwin's remarkable theory which has survived a century and a half of rigorous scientific skepticism and scrutiny.

Susan Lindee / University of Pennsylvania
Susan Lindee is a Janice and Julian Bers Professor of History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania. She is also the Associate Dean for the School of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Lindee has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Burroughs Wellcome Fund 40th Anniversary Award, as well as support from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Wenner-Gren Foundation.

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