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One Day University with The Seattle Times

April 27, 2019 9:00 AM – 12:45 PM

schedule

9:00 AM - 10:05 AM
How the 1960's Changed America: Lessons from a Pivotal Decade

Leonard Steinhorn / American University

We may not wear bell bottoms and tie-dye t-shirts anymore, and let's not talk about what happened to our hair. But even though almost half a century has passed since the 1960s, it's a decade that continues to reverberate in our society, politics, culture, and institutions to this very day.

In many ways, America today is a product of the Sixties. From civil rights to feminism to gay liberation to the environmental movement to the silent majority, what started back then has shaped and influenced our country ever since. Before the Sixties, Americans trusted their government and their leaders; since the Sixties, we question almost everything they do. Before the Sixties, it was Ozzie and Harriet, Father Knows Best, and the sturdy dad with the lunchpail that symbolized our culture; since the Sixties, diversity and individuality define who we are. Whereas we once looked to executives at General Motors and General Electric to chart our economic progress, we now gain inspiration from the late hippie who invented the iPhone. To understand America today, we must understand the lessons from the 1960s.

Leonard Steinhorn / American University
Leonard Steinhorn is a professor of communication and affiliate professor of history at American University. He currently serves as a political analyst for CBS News in Washington, D.C. He is the author of "The Greater Generation: In Defense of the Baby Boom Legacy," and co-author of "By the Color of Our Skin: The Illusion of Integration and the Reality of Race," books that have generated widespread discussion and debate. Professor Steinhorn's writings have been featured in several publications, including The Washington Post, Salon, Politico, and Huffington Post. He has twice been named Faculty Member of the Year at AU.

10:20 AM - 11:25 AM
Forever Young: How Scientists Are Learning to Keep Us From Getting Old

Jill Helms / Stanford University

Longevity: the ambition of kings, super villains - and pretty much all of us that enjoy waking up each morning. It's also become a focus for biotechnology companies interested in making a big impact on healthcare. According to Professor Jill Helms, questions of this magnitude require "moonshot thinking" and some extreme team science. In this lecture, she will explain how her Stanford group is working to better understand why we age, and translating that knowledge into strategies that slow this natural process. We will learn about scientific insights and potential therapies they've discovered that can help us learn how to age better.

Jill Helms / Stanford University
Jill Helms is a Professor of Surgery at Stanford University. Before Stanford, she taught at the University of California at San Francisco, where she was the Director of the Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. She is the Former President of the American Society of Craniofacial Genetics, and has received numerous awards, such as the IADR Distinguished Scientist Award for Craniofacial Biology Research, the ADA Student Researcher of the Year award, and the Howmedica Research Award.

11:40 AM - 12:45 PM
How to Watch Movies Like a Film Professor

Marc Lapadula / Yale University

Great film directors all have one thing in common -- lofty artistic ambitions. They take on the toughest issues and most provocative themes of their day hoping to eloquently bring them to life on screen. They regard the movie screen the same way great artists gaze upon their canvases. Every inch of the frame offers a crucial opportunity to leave audiences spellbound by their handiwork.

The most challenging directors disguise their bold artistic intentions behind the mask of easily accessible genre forms, oftentimes burying something quite profound beneath a story’s glossy surface.

This sort of "subtext" and the prospect of unraveling a hidden, encoded message in a film is what drives some movie lovers (and Yale film professors) to attempt to decipher what is really going on beneath the scenes playing out on screen. There is always something much more mesmerizing to be uncovered in a great film once it's been brought out into the light. This presentation will illustrate some remarkable examples of cinematic mastery through technical innovation and complex thematic construction. The films selected for this presentation accomplish their missions by eliciting some of the most memorable moments and performances ever captured on celluloid.

Film Clips Include:

CASABLANCA, CITIZEN KANE, THE GODFATHER, PSYCHO, DOCTOR STRANGELOVE

Marc Lapadula / Yale University
Marc Lapadula is a Senior Lecturer in the Film Studies Program at Yale University. He is a playwright, screenwriter and an award-winning film producer. In addition to Yale, Marc has taught at Columbia University's Graduate Film School, created the screenwriting programs at both The University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins where he won Outstanding Teaching awards and has lectured on film, playwriting and conducted highly-acclaimed screenwriting seminars all across the country at notable venues like The National Press Club, The Smithsonian Institution, The Commonwealth Club and The New York Historical Society.

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