One Day University Live in Naples

Saturday, November 13, 2021 9:30 am - 1:00 pm

schedule

9:30 am - 10:30 am
Merely Bystanders: The Psychology of Courage and Inaction

Catherine Sanderson / Amherst College

The Psychology of Courage

Why do good people so often do nothing when a seemingly small action could make a big difference? A pioneering social psychologist, Catherine Sanderson, explains why moral courage is so rare, and reveals how it can be triggered or trained. We are bombarded every day by reports of bad behavior, from sexual harassment to political corruption and bullying belligerence. It’s tempting to blame evil acts on evil people, but that leaves the rest us off the hook. Silence, after all, can perpetuate cruelty. This class draws on the latest developments in psychology and neuroscience to tackle an urgent question: Why do so many of us fail to intervene when we’re needed—and what would it take to make us step up?

Learn More About The Psychology Of Taking Action

Learn more about the psychology of taking action by checking out other great videos at OneDayU, including ‘The Presidential Reading List‘, ‘Beethoven & The Beatles: Hearing The Connection’ & ‘The Presidents Book Club’ all on-demand now.

Catherine Sanderson / Amherst College

Catherine Sanderson is the Poler Family Professor and Chair of Psychology at Amherst College, and is often cited as the school’s most popular professor. Her research has received grant funding from the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Health. She has published over 25 journal articles in addition to three college textbooks. In 2012, she was named one of the country’s top 300 professors by the Princeton Review.

10:45 am - 11:45 am
Musicals That Changed Broadway (and Where It’s Headed Next)

Sean Hartley / Kaufman Music Center

Hamilton made history not long ago by receiving a grand total of 16 nominations at the Tony Awards – ultimately winning a total of 11, including Best Musical. The phenomenon is part of a long lineage of musical theater productions that capture the public’s attention and reflect the culture surrounding them. This class will explore a few of those in depth. Broadway combines the thrill of live music with the compelling storytelling and drama of watching a movie or TV show. When done with incredible care and sensitivity, the combination of the two can lead to something transformative.

Looking over the past decade and the history of Broadway, one readily sees that a new phenomenon has developed. Many theaters are presenting hits that occupy Broadway stages for longer than shows ever had previously. Some say this change has turned the New York theater district into more of an adult amusement park then an evolving cultural center. For most of the Coronavirus pandemic, all Broadway theaters were closed, but they’re starting to reopen. Will Broadway be changed permanently as a result? In fact, has it already been transformed in the modern era?

Sean Hartley / Kaufman Music Center

Sean Hartley is the director at the Kaufman Music Center’s Theater Wing, the chair of the SMS Admissions Assessment Committee, and on the faculty of the SMS Chorus and LMS Dalcroze. He is the Producer/Host of Broadway Close Up as well as Broadway Playhouse. Sean is also a playwright, composer, and lyricist: Cupid And Psyche (Drama Desk nomination,) Little Women; Snow (ASCAP Harold Arlen Award.); Leaving Home. He is in residence at the Hermitage Artist Retreat in Sarasota.

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
The American Revolution: Inside the Minds of the Founding Fathers

Louis Masur / Rutgers University

Long after the Revolutionary era, John Adams asked “what do we mean by the American Revolution?” He said “the Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people,” that the real Revolution was a radical change in thinking—“the principles, opinions, sentiments, and affections of the people.”

Focusing on the ideas of such leaders as Adams, Jefferson, Hamilton, Madison and Washington, we shall examine that revolution in the principles and conflicts that characterized the revolutionary era of 1770-1800. Adams believed that through a common set of beliefs “thirteen clocks were made to strike together,” but by 1800 that unity of purpose had unraveled into violent political debate that threatened the survival of the nation. “Whether you or I were right, posterity must judge,” Adams wrote to Jefferson. We are that posterity.

Louis Masur / Rutgers University

Louis Masur is a Distinguished Professor of American Studies and History at Rutgers University. He received outstanding teaching awards from Rutgers, Trinity College, and the City College of New York, and won the Clive Prize for Excellence in Teaching from Harvard University. He is the author of many books, including Lincoln’s Last Speech, which was inspired by a talk he presented at One Day University. His essays and articles have appeared in The New York Times, the Washington Post, Slate, and on CNN. He is an elected member of the American Antiquarian Society and serves on the Historians’ Council of the Gettysburg Foundation.

One Day University prioritizes the health and safety of our audiences. We will be following all local and CDC regulations in regards to COVID-19 at our events. Additionally, only individuals who can show confirmation that they are fully vaccinated (or negative COVID-19 test results less than 72 hours old) will be admitted to One Day University events.