One Day University Live in Denver

Saturday, July 31, 2021 9:30 am - 1:00 pm

schedule

9:30 am - 10:30 am
The Impossible Presidency: Rethinking Our Nation's Highest Office

Jeremi Suri / University of Texas

The American presidency is the most powerful political office in the world. Surprisingly, most contemporary presidents have found themselves severely constrained in their ability to pursue their chosen agendas for domestic and foreign policy change. This lecture will explain why, focusing on the nature of government bureaucracy, the range of American challenges and commitments, and the development of the modern media.

We will begin with the founding vision of the U.S. presidency and the actions of its first occupant, George Washington. Then, we’ll examine the presidencies of Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, and the most recent office-holders. We will focus on how the power of the presidency has changed over time and what that has meant for American society. The lecture will close with reflections for how we can improve presidential leadership in future years.

Jeremi Suri / University of Texas

Jeremi Suri holds the Mack Brown Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a professor in the University’s Department of History and the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs. The author and editor of nine books on contemporary politics and foreign policy, his most recent is entitled: The Impossible Presidency: The Rise and Fall of America’s Office. In 2007, Smithsonian magazine named him one of America’s “Top Young Innovators” in the Arts and Sciences. In 2018, Suri received the President’s Associates Teaching Excellence Award from the University of Texas, and the Pro Bene Meritis Award for Public Contributions to the Liberal Arts.

10:45 am - 11:45 am
Visions of America: The Real Stories Behind Famous Photographs

Jennifer Keene / Chapman University

Can a photograph really change history or define an age? We live in an era dominated by Instagram and Photoshop, but curated images have shaped the way we understand the present and the past since the invention of photography. Our schooling imbues us with a mental slide show of iconic photographs, images that serve as short-cuts for understanding critical historical moments. But the camera was never just a passive observer of historical events. Instead, generations of photographers wielded the camera as a weapon to shape public opinion; to initiate social change; to capture the essence of a pivotal moment. But who ultimately controls the meaning or significance of an image? The photographer, the viewer, or history?

This lecture explores the creation, diffusion, and reception of iconic images, stories that ultimately render these images even more meaningful. Jacob Riis, Lewis Hine, James Van Der Zee, Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, Joe Rosenthal, Charles Moore, and Eddie Addams explored poverty, child labor, migration, civil liberties, war, and civil rights – shaping our vision of modern America.

Jennifer Keene / Chapman University

Jennifer Keene is a professor of history and dean of the Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at Chapman University. She has published several books and numerous articles on the American experience in the world wars, including Doughboys, the Great War and the Remaking of America, The United States and the First World War, and World War II: Core Documents. She has received numerous awards for her scholarship, including Fulbright Senior Scholar Awards to France and Australia, and the Mellon Library of Congress Fellowship in International Studies. Professor Keene has served as a historical consultant for exhibits and films, including the PBS documentary mini-series, “The Great War.”

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
The Science of Sleep and Stress: How they Affect Creativity, Focus, and Memory

Jessica Payne / University of Notre Dame

What's going on in your head while you sleep? The research of Notre Dame Professor Jessica Payne shows that the non-waking hours are incredibly valuable for your day-to-day life, especially for helping to commit information to memory and for problem solving. If you ever thought sleep was just downtime between one task and the next, think again. The fact is, your brain pulls an all-nighter when you hit the hay. Many regions of the brain – especially those involved in learning, processing information, and emotion – are actually more active during sleep than when you're awake. These regions are working together while you sleep, helping you process and sort information you've taken in during the course of the day. Professor Payne's research has focused on what types of information are submitted to memory, and has been instrumental in better understanding how the brain stores the information. 

Sound interesting? It is. And useful too, as Professor Payne will outline all sorts of practical information on how to control your sleep habits to insure maximum productivity.

Jessica Payne / University of Notre Dame

Jessica Payne is the Nancy O’Neill Collegiate Chair and Professor of Psychology at the University of Notre Dame, where she directs the Sleep, Stress, and Memory Lab. Her course, The Sleeping Brain, routinely sports a waitlist because of its immense popularity among Notre Dame students. In 2012, Professor Payne received the Frank O’Malley Undergraduate Teaching Award. She is also a two-time recipient of the Distinction in Teaching Award, and won the Award for Teaching Excellence at Harvard University’s Derek Bok Center.

One Day University prioritizes the health and safety of our audiences. We will be following all local and CDC regulations in regards to COVID-19 at our events. Additionally, only individuals who can show confirmation that they are fully vaccinated will be admitted to One Day University events.
No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.