One Day University in Fairfield, CT

Sunday, September 16, 2018 9:30 am - 1:15 pm

schedule

12:10 pm - 1:15 pm
The Presidents' Book Club: Books that shaped Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, Roosevelt and others

Joseph Luzzi / Bard College

The Presidential Reading List

All of us at One Day U who love books wondered about the reading habits of past presidents, and what we found led us to offer this new brand new course.

Award-winning Literature Professor Joseph Luzzi will guide audiences through a fascinating “Presidents’ Library,” as we explore the books and the presidential reading list that shaped six of the most powerful men ever to sit in the Oval Office. We will discuss why George Washington was obsessed with a play about a Roman freedom fighter who opposed Julius Caesar; how Thomas Jefferson came to have the largest personal library in the country; what drew Abraham Lincoln to Shakespeare so obsessively (and which Shakespeare play he loved most!); which British poet Franklin Delano Roosevelt memorized as a child and read throughout his life; why John F. Kennedy was devoted to a spy novelist whose books would create one of the greatest film franchises in history; and how Barack Obama came to understand his American identity and spirit through two favorite authors.

Together, we will see how presidential action and presidential reading are intimately linked, as we explore the momentous events in these presidents’ lives in light of the books that inspired their thoughts and guided their actions. Professor Luzzi will also summarize his “ALL” (American Library List) detailing the sometimes surprising books and literature which influenced many other U. S. leaders.

Learn more about our history by checking out other great videos at OneDayU, including ‘A Grand Tour Of Italy‘, Masterpieces Of Art That Changed All The Rules’ & ‘Beethoven & The Beatles: Hearing The Connection’ all on-demand now.

Joseph Luzzi / Bard College

Joseph Luzzi is a Literature and Italian Professor at Bard College, and was previously a Visiting Professor at the University of Pennsylvania, where he received the Scaglione Prize for his teaching. He is also the author of the audio course, “The Art of Reading.” Professor Luzzi previously taught at Yale University, where he was awarded a Yale College Teaching Prize.

10:50 am - 11:55 am
American Immigration: Fear, Myth, and Reality

Rachel Friedberg / Brown University

The Statue of Liberty is the quintessential symbol of the United States. But as the debate over immigration reform rages in Congress and the media, has the welcome mat worn thin? What does it meant to hold out a beacon to the world's "tired, poor, huddled masses"? Do we welcome immigrants in because of or despite their economic impact on the United States?

Many in the American labor movement contend that immigrants take jobs away from native-born workers and send wages tumbling. But do they really? Drawing on the research into the economic impact of immigration, Rachel Friedberg examines how new immigrants fare in the U.S. labor market, and how they affect the economic well-being of those of us already here.

Rachel Friedberg / Brown University

Rachel Friedberg is a Distinguished Senior Lecturer in Economics at Brown University. Professor Friedberg’s research focuses on the labor market performance and assimilation of immigrants in the United States and Israel, the transferability of human capital, and the impact of immigration on native labor market outcomes.

9:30 am - 10:35 am
Ethical Dilemmas and Modern Medicine: Questions Nobody Wants to Ask

Jacob Appel / Brown University

Medical Ethical Questions, Dilemmas & Issues

The same medical technologies that have brought us miracle drugs and unprecedented longevity are also forcing us to confront increasingly difficult ethical dilemmas. Should taxpayers spend several million dollars to prolong one patient’s life for one month? Can genes be patented? How ought judges respond when doctors and family members disagree on the very definition of death? May a seventeen-year-old boy refuse to give a life-saving bone marrow transplant to his fifteen-year-old cousin? Thirty years ago, debates in medical ethics focused on the same questions that had once puzzled Hippocrates and Galen many centuries earlier. When does life begin? When may confidentiality be broken? Must a physician help a stranger in need?

Ethical Issues In Modern Medicine

Today, most challenges in bioethics arise from two relatively novel sets of issues: 1.) conflicts over scarce healthcare resources and 2.) the desire of philosophical and religious minorities to be opt out of established medical norms. How society ultimately resolves these questions is not simply an abstract matter for debate by philosophers and ethicists. Rather, the outcome of these controversies is likely to affect each and every one of us when we or our loved ones become ill. This lecture will examine some paradigmatic recent cases in the field of bioethics and will offer students a framework for analyzing future cases on their own.

Learn more about our history by checking out other great videos at OneDayU, including ‘What Happened To The News, ‘Music & Theater: Past, Present & Future& ‘Making Better Choices: The Art & Science Of Rational Decision Making’ all on-demand now.

Jacob Appel / Brown University

Jacob Appel is an American author, bioethicist, physician, lawyer and social critic. He is best known for his short stories, his work as a playwright, and his writing in the fields of reproductive ethics, organ donation, neuroethics and euthanasia. Appel’s novel, The Man Who Wouldn’t Stand Up, won the Dundee International Book Prize in 2012. He has taught medical ethics at New York University, Columbia University, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and Brown University’s Alpert Medical School.