One Day University with the Cleveland Plain Dealer

Saturday, February 22, 2020 9:30 am - 1:15 pm

schedule

9:30 am - 10:35 am
America and the World 2020: Where Are We Now? (And where are we going?)

William Burke-White / University of Pennsylvania

What does the international system of the future look like? Since the end of World War II, the answer has been an international order created by the United States and a coalition of like-minded states. That coalition has advanced a shared global vision rooted in economic liberalization, shared security commitments, and mutual values such as human rights. Today, however, disruptive forces are threatening the post-WWII international order. In a time of international crises ranging from Iran and North Korea to the health of the global economy, it is far from clear whether the international order as we know it can survive.

In the wake of World War II, the US and its allies constructed an international system that provided lasting stability and advanced their interests and values, including open economic flows, a US security guarantee, and core liberal values. Today, that system is under threat from 5 disruptive trends: 1) power shifts from the US to China and others, 2) the rise of populist nationalism around the world, 3) artificial intelligence and information transparency, 4) the rise of non-state actors, and 5) the threat of climate change. In light of these disruptive forces, can post-WWII order continue? Can liberal values survive? If not, what will global politics look like in the years ahead? This talk will conclude with three distinct visions of the global order that may emerge in the decades ahead. What might these different world orders mean for our economy, for our security, and for our values?

William Burke-White / University of Pennsylvania

William Burke-White is the Richard Perry Professor and Inaugural Director of the Perry World House at the University of Pennsylvania. He served in the Obama Administration from 2009-2011 on Secretary Clinton’s Policy Planning Staff. He was also principal drafter of the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review, Secretary Clinton’s hallmark foreign policy and institutional reform effort. Professor Burke-White has received the Levin Award and the Gorman award for Excellence in Teaching.

10:50 am - 11:55 am
The Human Brain: What We Know (and what we don't)

Heather Berlin / Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

How Much Do We Know About the Brain?

You are your brain, according to modern neuroscience, but how exactly do your thoughts, feelings, perceptions and sense of self derive from this three-pound organ locked inside the black box of your skull? Cognitive neuroscientist Dr. Heather Berlin has been seeking answers to those questions for decades, and finding surprising answers in the brains of people with psychiatric and neurological disorders. What happens in the brains of people who can’t control themselves, or whose sense of self is fragmented, or lost entirely? By tracing the distinct brain circuits that give rise to her patients’ disorders, Dr. Berlin is revealing the neurophysiology that makes each of us who we are.

How Does the Human Brain Work and How Much Do We Know?

Join us on a journey deep into the brain, the mind, and the self, as Professor Berlin reveals the startling and exciting recent findings of cutting-edge neuroscience. How does your brain accomplish spontaneous creativity? How much self-control or “free will” do we really have? And what does the future hold, once brains begin to integrate with “neural prosthetics”? Get to know your dynamic unconscious mind, a bigger part of “who you are” than you could ever guess, with Dr. Berlin as your guide.

Learn More About How The Brain Works

For more lectures about the human brain check out the rest of Professor Heather Berlin’s lectures in our video librarySign up for One Day University Membership today for unlimited access to hundreds of talks and online lectures.

Heather Berlin / Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Heather Berlin is a cognitive neuroscientist, Professor of Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Visiting Scholar at the New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute. She is a committee member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Science and Entertainment Exchange, and host of the PBS series “Science Goes to the Movies,” and the Discovery Channel series “Superhuman Showdown.”Professor Berlin has been the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including a Young Investigator Award from the American Neuropsychiatric Association, the International Neuropsychological Society Phillip M. Rennick Award, and the Clifford Yorke Prize from the International Neuropsychoanalysis Society.

12:10 pm - 1:15 pm
How to Watch Movies Like a Film Professor

Marc Lapadula / Yale University

Great film directors all have one thing in common — lofty artistic ambitions. They choose to take on the toughest issues and most provocative themes of their day hoping to eloquently bring them to life on screen. They regard the movie screen the same way great artists gaze upon their canvases. Every inch of the frame offers a crucial opportunity to leave audiences spellbound by their handiwork. The most challenging directors disguise their bold artistic intentions behind the mask of easily accessible genre forms, oftentimes burying something quite profound beneath a story’s glossy surface. This sort of “subtext” and the prospect of unraveling a hidden, encoded message in a film is what drives some movie lovers (and Yale film professors) to attempt to decipher what is really going on beneath the scenes playing out before our eyes. There is always something much more mesmerizing to be uncovered in a great film once it’s been brought out into the light. This presentation will illustrate some remarkable examples of cinematic mastery through technical innovation and complex thematic construction. The films selected for this presentation accomplish their missions by eliciting some of the most memorable (and timeless) moments and performances ever captured on celluloid.

Film Clips Include:

CASABLANCA (Michael Curtiz), CITIZEN KANE (Orson Welles), PSYCHO (Alfred Hitchcock), THE GODFATHER & THE GODFATHER: Part II (Francis Ford Coppola)

Marc Lapadula / Yale University

Marc Lapadula is a Senior Lecturer in the Film Studies Program at Yale University. He is a playwright, screenwriter and an award-winning film producer. In addition to Yale, Marc has taught at Columbia University’s Graduate Film School, created the screenwriting programs at both The University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins where he won Outstanding Teaching awards and has lectured on film, playwriting and conducted highly-acclaimed screenwriting seminars all across the country at notable venues like The National Press Club, The Smithsonian Institution, The Commonwealth Club and The New York Historical Society.