One Day University with The Oregonian

Saturday, November 02, 2019 9:30 am - 1:15 pm

schedule

9:30 am - 10:35 am
Masterpieces of Art that Changed All the Rules

Denise Budd / Columbia University

Art That Has Changed The World

We often think of art of bygone centuries as a means of recording the past – creating long-lasting records of people, places and cultures – offering us the means to help understand history and our own relationship to it. In this way, a walk through a museum can be a fascinating journey through time. Yet some of the greatest and most revolutionary works of art do so much more than document the world; rather, they change how we see it.

This class will examine a small number of extraordinary objects drawn from the Western tradition, including paintings, sculpture and architecture, originating from different countries and spanning more than two millennia. Considering monuments as varied as the Parthenon of ancient Greece and the French sculptor Auguste Rodin’s Burghers of Calais, from Masaccio’s Holy Trinity to Diego Velázquez’s Las Meninas, we will focus on works that, in many ways, are as much about the experience of the viewer as they are about the subjects they represent.

Learn more about our history by checking out other great videos at OneDayU, including ‘An Evening With Leonardo Da Vinci‘, The Psychology of Courage & Taking Action’ & ‘The Presidents Book Club’ all on-demand now.

Denise Budd / Columbia University

Denise Budd teaches art history at Columbia University and a wide range of Renaissance art classes at Rutgers University. She has published several articles on Leonardo da Vinci based on her studies of the artist and his documentary evidence. Following this interest in archival work, her current research has extended to the history of collecting Renaissance art in Gilded Age America, with a focus on the tapestry collector and dealer Charles Mather Foulke.

10:50 am - 11:55 am
China, Russia, and The European Union: What's Next (and why)?

Steven Lamy / University of Southern California

What happens when the peace and prosperity provided by US leadership after the Cold War goes away? This talk explores two simple questions. Are we headed for a new period of great power rivalry? And who will lead? We will explore the growth of China's economic interests and its global reach through its economic investments. We will also look at Russia's return to great power status and the security challenges it presents to the rest of the world. Finally, even with Brexit, the EU remains a formidable group of 27 countries that is refocusing it's attention on a more purposeful foreign and defense policy strategy.

For the western powers whose order has prevailed since the end of WW2, both China and Russia present existential challenges. With a nationalist in the White House, not interested in foreign policy and dismissive of international cooperation and institutions, the EU may have to save what is left of the liberal international order. What does this uncertainty about the future of world order mean for all us?

Steven Lamy / University of Southern California

Steven Lamy is a professor of international relations and a Vice Dean at the University of Southern California. He has been named professor of the year four times. Professor Lamy was the director of USC’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and its Center for Public Education in International Affairs. He is also the co-Principal Investigator in a Luce Foundation Grant on Religion Identity and Global Governance.

12:10 pm - 1:15 pm
Forever Young: How Scientists Are Learning to Keep Us From Getting Old

Jill Helms / Stanford University

Longevity: the ambition of kings, super villains – and pretty much all of us that enjoy waking up each morning. It's also become a focus for biotechnology companies interested in making a big impact on healthcare. According to Professor Jill Helms, questions of this magnitude require "moonshot thinking" and some extreme team science. In this lecture, she will explain how her Stanford group is working to better understand why we age, and translating that knowledge into strategies that slow this natural process. We will learn about scientific insights and potential therapies they've discovered that can help us learn how to age better.

Jill Helms / Stanford University

Jill Helms is a Professor of Surgery at Stanford University. Before Stanford, she taught at the University of California at San Francisco, where she was the Director of the Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. She is the Former President of the American Society of Craniofacial Genetics, and has received numerous awards, such as the IADR Distinguished Scientist Award for Craniofacial Biology Research, the ADA Student Researcher of the Year award, and the Howmedica Research Award.