One Day University with the San Francisco Chronicle

Saturday, June 13, 2020 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

schedule

10:00 am - 11:20 am
The Future of Lying: The New Rules of Deception and Trust

Jeffrey Hancock / Stanford University

Let's face it: people lie. We lie to each other and to ourselves. How is the rewiring of communication in the digital revolution changing how we lie? How can we trust that online review, or that text message about someone being on their way?

In this talk we'll go over the state-of-the-art in deception detection research on how to spot a liar online, explore some new forms of deception, and examine how different technologies affect both how we lie and how we trust online. The talk reveals several key principles that can guide how we can think about deception and truth in this new digital age.

Jeffrey Hancock / Stanford University

Jeffrey Hancock is a Professor of Communications at Stanford University. He was the Chair of the Information Science Department, and the co-Director of Cognitive Science at Cornell University. He is interested in social interactions mediated by information and communication technology, with an emphasis on how people produce and understand language in these contexts. His TED Talk on deception has been seen over 1 million times and he has been featured as a guest on “CBS This Morning” for his expertise on social media.

11:40 am - 1:00 pm
America in WWI: What Really Happened and Why it Matters

Jennifer Keene / Chapman University

Most Americans possess only a hazy understanding of World War I or its significance for the United States. So why not leave it there? Why bother with this history lesson? How the nation responded to the challenge of fighting its first modern war re-made America, leading to female suffrage, the modern civil rights movement, the drive to protect civil liberties, new conceptions of military service, and an expanded role for the United States in the world.

There are striking parallels between the problems Americans faced a hundred years ago in 1917-18 and the challenges we face now. How do we balance protecting national security with civil liberties? Is it appropriate for Americans to continue to debate a war once the fighting has begun? Are immigrants importing terrorism? Do Americans have a responsibility to participate in global humanitarianism? Can soldiers ever convey to those at home the reality of what they’ve encountered on the battlefield? Can they ever leave the war behind? Americans grappled with these issues in World War I, and these are once again relevant questions for a society at war.

Jennifer Keene / Chapman University

Jennifer Keene is a professor of history and dean of the Wilkinson College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at Chapman University. She has published several books and numerous articles on the American experience in the world wars, including “Doughboys, the Great War and the Remaking of America”, “World War I: The American Soldier Experience”, and “World War II: Core Documents”. She has received numerous awards for her scholarship, including Fulbright Senior Scholar Awards to France and Australia and Mellon Library of Congress Fellowship in International Studies. She has served as a historical consultant for exhibits and films, and was recently featured in the PBS documentary mini-series, “The Great War”.

2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Four Memorable Musicals That Changed Broadway

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University

Hamilton made history not long ago by receiving a grand total of 16 nominations for Tony Awards – ultimately winning a total of 11, including Best Musical. The phenomenon is part of a long lineage of musical theater productions that capture the public’s attention and reflects the culture surrounding it. Broadway combines the thrill of live music with the compelling storytelling and drama of watching a movie or TV show and, when done with incredible care and sensitivity, the combination of the two can lead to something transformative.

Orin Grossman / Fairfield University

Orin Grossman is renowned internationally for his knowledge of music. He lectures and performs concerts throughout the US and Europe, he teaches Performing Arts at Fairfield University, and has served as the University’s Academic Vice President. Professor Grossman has been particularly associated with the music of George Gershwin, performing concerts of his song transcriptions and classical pieces to critical praise around the world, including performances in Cairo and New York. Professor Grossman was also chosen to play for the New York City Mayor’s Awards of Honor for Arts and Culture.