One Day University with the Star Tribune

Saturday, August 01, 2020 9:30 am - 1:15 pm

schedule

9:30 am - 10:35 am
The Art of Aging: A Prescription for Mind and Body

Catherine Sanderson / Amherst College

The Art of Aging 

No matter how old you are, you’re aging. You started aging from the moment you were born, and you’ll continue aging until the moment you die. That’s the brutal, universal fact. But people age differently, as you’ve noticed if you’ve looked around and compared yourself to your peers. Are you aging better than they are? Worse than they are? In what ways and for what reasons?

We’ve all heard about the placebo effect – which explains why name-brand medicines work better than the generic stuff, even when they share the exact same ingredients. But did you know that the way we think about ourselves and the world around us dramatically impacts our health, how fast or slow we age, and even how long we live? In fact, people with a positive mindset about aging live on average 7.5 years longer than those without. That might sound alarming to those of us who struggle to see the bright side, but the good news is we can make surprisingly simple changes or small shifts to how we think, feel, and act that will really pay off.

In this talk, Dr. Catherine Sanderson breaks down the science of thought and shows how our mindset—or thought pattern—exerts a substantial influence on physical health. Most importantly, this talk ends by giving specific strategies we can all use, no matter our natural tendency, to make minor tweaks in our thoughts and behaviors that will improve the quality and length of our lives. 

How to Age Gracefully

At the end of this lecture we’ll discuss what’s common with aging (everybody shrinks a little), what’s not normal (Alzheimer’s is a disease not everyone gets), and key components of successful aging (friends and family are important, but perhaps in different ways). The trajectory of aging gets shaped very early in life, but there are powerful forces that guide it along the way, and steps you can take to maximize your later years.

Learn More About the Art of Aging

For more lectures about health and tips for aging gracefully check out Catherine Sanderson’s psychology lectures in our video library. Sign up for One Day University Membership today for unlimited access to hundreds of talks and online lectures.

Catherine Sanderson / Amherst College

Catherine Sanderson is the James E. Ostendarp Professor of Psychology at Amherst College, and is often cited as the school’s most popular professor. Her research has received grant funding from the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Health. She has published over 25 journal articles in addition to three college textbooks. In 2012, she was named one of the country’s top 300 professors by the Princeton Review.

10:50 am - 11:55 am
How the 1960s Changed America: Lessons from a Pivotal Decade

Leonard Steinhorn / American University

We may not wear bell bottoms and tie-dye t-shirts anymore, and let’s not talk about what happened to our hair. But even though it’s been half a century since the 1960s, it’s a decade that continues to reverberate in our society, politics, culture, and institutions to this very day. In so many ways it was the Sixties that spawned today’s polarization and culture wars, which divide us now the way Vietnam did back then. From civil rights to feminism to gay liberation to the environmental movement to the silent majority, what started in the Sixties has shaped and influenced our country ever since.

To many, the presidency of Barack Obama symbolized the liberation movements of the Sixties. But it’s also important to ask how the Sixties produced the presidency of Donald Trump. It’s the Sixties, its meaning and its legacy that may well be the dividing line in our politics today.

Leonard Steinhorn / American University

Leonard Steinhorn is a professor of communication and affiliate professor of history at American University. He currently serves as a political analyst for CBS News in Washington, D.C. He is the author of “The Greater Generation: In Defense of the Baby Boom Legacy,” and co-author of “By the Color of Our Skin: The Illusion of Integration and the Reality of Race,” books that have generated widespread discussion and debate. Professor Steinhorn’s writings have been featured in several publications, including The Washington Post, Salon, Politico, and Huffington Post. He has twice been named Faculty Member of the Year at AU.

12:10 pm - 1:15 pm
Four Memorable Musicals That Changed Broadway

Sean Hartley / Kaufman Music Center

Groundbreaking Musicals In Broadway That Have Influenced Society

Hamilton made history not long ago by receiving a grand total of 16 nominations for Tony Awards – ultimately winning a total of 11, including Best Musical. The phenomenon is part of a long lineage of musical theater productions that capture the public’s attention and reflects the culture surrounding it. Broadway combines the thrill of live music with the compelling storytelling and drama of watching a movie or TV show and, when done with incredible care and sensitivity, the combination of the two can lead to something groundbreaking, and even transform society as we know it.

Learn more about our history by checking out other great videos at OneDayU, including ‘A 400 Year History of Religion In America‘, A Different America: How The Country Has Changed From 1969 Until Today’ & ‘American Democracy: Where Are We Now’ all on-demand now.

Sean Hartley / Kaufman Music Center

Sean Hartley is the director at the Kaufman Music Center’s Theater Wing, the chair of the SMS Admissions Assessment Committee, and on the faculty of the SMS Chorus and LMS Dalcroze. He is the Producer/Host of Broadway Close Up as well as Broadway Playhouse. Sean is also a playwright, composer, and lyricist: Cupid And Psyche (Drama Desk nomination,) Little Women; Snow (ASCAP Harold Arlen Award.); Leaving Home. He is in residence at the Hermitage Artist Retreat in Sarasota.